It's a country that is neither part of Europe or Asia, has its own unique alphabet and is better known for medieval monks and Soviet dictators than high-speed internet – however the Republic of Georgia wants digital nomads to call it home.

The Caucus nation is granting new 'work-from-home' visas for international visitors to live and work remotely for up to 12 months.

Georgia (or საქართველო as it is known in the local Kartvelian language) is regularly confused with the US State and is only a third of the size.

You could be forgiven for not having heard of the county until now – however this should be exciting news for freelancers with a taste for adventure.

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12 months is plenty of time to visit Georgia's relatively un-exlored countryside. Photo / Max Benidze, Flickr
12 months is plenty of time to visit Georgia's relatively un-exlored countryside. Photo / Max Benidze, Flickr

Within its 70,000 square kilometers are castles, beautiful mountains and scenic vineyards growing more wine varieties than the state of South Australia. The country has been appearing on more travel bucket lists every year as a gateway to central Asia.

More importantly, it's exceedingly affordable. The Cost of Living Index rates the capital Tbilisi at around 60 per cent cheaper than Auckland with monthly living costs per person comfortably under $620.

"We want to use this opportunity. We are talking about opening the border in a way to protect the health of our citizens, but, on the other hand, to bring to Georgia citizens of all countries who can work remotely," said Natia Turnava, the country's economy minister.

Georgian wine has recently put the country back on the map. Photo / Flickr, Andrzej Wójtowicz
Georgian wine has recently put the country back on the map. Photo / Flickr, Andrzej Wójtowicz

To start your new Georgian life you simply have to register on the online portal to provide information about your employment and a letter of consent to undergo a fortnight of self-isolation. Non-nationals have to be able to pay for their own quarantine expenses.

Then there is the potential drawback for 'digital nomads' and online freelancers that internet speed may not be quite what you're used to.

Georgia: Tbilisi is an affordable bolt hole for freelancers. Photo / Mostafa Meraji, Unsplash
Georgia: Tbilisi is an affordable bolt hole for freelancers. Photo / Mostafa Meraji, Unsplash

Average broadband speed in Tbilisi is 13 Mb/s around half that of Auckland.
But who's in a hurry? Pour yourself another glass of Amber wine, you have 12 months in one of the most beautiful and unexplored countries on earth.

Georgia is reopening to international travellers from July 31st and has fared well in its coronavirus response, recording only 1085 cases.

Other destinations opening up to WFH tourism

If traditional polyphonic Goran music is not your thing and you're after more guaranteed beach weather – you could do worse than Barbados.

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Barbados work and play: Not a bad view from the office. Photo / Kamil Kalbarczyk, Unsplash
Barbados work and play: Not a bad view from the office. Photo / Kamil Kalbarczyk, Unsplash

The Caribbean island is offering its own version of the remote work visa from July 12.
The "12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp" grants a year-long span for visitors to work and play from the beach.

There are worse places to wait out the disruption of a pandemic.

Dial us up! We're swapping the tired office chair for a beach-side sunlounger.