July weather is expected to start off wet and wild before easing off into more milder temperatures.

Western areas of both islands will get the brunt of the cold southerlies and accompanied rain, while eventually eastern areas will get drier, Philip Duncan of weatherwatch.co.nz says.

"We're looking at July and seeing an unsettled first half of the month along with more high pressure than normal as we head through the month.

"Basically the unsettled pattern that developed in June carries on into July - but by week 2 and 3 of July huge highs from Australia return and track across the country bringing extended dry spells - and, once again, limiting how much rain falls further north and east."

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This weekend sees sub-tropical winds return to some northern regions, while a cold front with a west to south west change builds in the Tasman Sea. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
This weekend sees sub-tropical winds return to some northern regions, while a cold front with a west to south west change builds in the Tasman Sea. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
On July 6, a low may deepen just off the Canterbury coast bringing in a wet, cold, southerly but creating drier, sunnier, weather in the west. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
On July 6, a low may deepen just off the Canterbury coast bringing in a wet, cold, southerly but creating drier, sunnier, weather in the west. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz

As for who would get the most, Canterbury looked set to get average amounts of rainfall, while Taranaki, and parts of the West Coast and Southland would be wetter than average.

And although Auckland water storage dams would get more downpours, Duncan said "generally speaking" July would be drier than normal despite "plenty of showers".

However, the wet and cold weather will start in the east before westerlies become more dominant eventually drying out that coast.

"This airflow is also a fairly average one for temperatures, although July kicks off colder than average in many regions with July 1st an especially cold day for the South Island.

By around July 9, a very weak low pressure system becomes trapped between two highs. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
By around July 9, a very weak low pressure system becomes trapped between two highs. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
By the week of July 16, these two highs will encourage a mild change in the weather pattern. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
By the week of July 16, these two highs will encourage a mild change in the weather pattern. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz

"However, these large highs and westerlies will help contribute fairly normal temperatures in the big scheme of things.

"July should be about average temperature-wise [of course there will be some colder than normal days and milder than usual ones in the mix] but overall perhaps leans just very slightly above average nationwide."

And those keen to hit the slopes shouldn't be too worried as some "good southerly changes" would bring more snow to the South Island ski fields while high pressure systems bring clear skies and cold nights which were ideal for snowmaking.

Overall the country will be slightly warmer than average in July. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
Overall the country will be slightly warmer than average in July. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
Western areas of the country are in line for a wetter than usual July compared to the rest of New Zealand which will a bit drier. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz
Western areas of the country are in line for a wetter than usual July compared to the rest of New Zealand which will a bit drier. Image / Weatherwatch.co.nz