In a decade that has begun with a mass-movement to shun air travel and coining the term 'flight shame', there's one place where the future of airplanes looks a little brighter.

The Crystal Cabin Awards 2020 is a showcase for the plane cabins of tomorrow.

The awards, which recognise innovation in cabin designs across eight categories, have attracted concept designs as varied as in-flight spas and foldaway plane beds.

While most conceptual entries are still just pies-in-the-sky, some are already on planes today.

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There are 105 entries on the long list which include universities and aerospace engineers from 21 different countries.

The winning designs will be announced in March at the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg.

Here are some of the ones to look out for on your next flight:

Takeaway coffee shop:

Dubai Aviation Engineering Projects has created a series of modules which can be swapped in for more seating, a coffee station or even an in-flight spa studio.
"Retractable Aircraft Cabin will allow whole rooms, from restaurants to spas, to be inserted into the aircraft cabin during ground handling," says Julia Grosser, a spokesperson for Hamburg Aviation.

Spa in the skies: Airbus's modular cabin spaces have enabled these imaginative entries. Photo / Supplied
Spa in the skies: Airbus's modular cabin spaces have enabled these imaginative entries. Photo / Supplied

Other projects designed to fit within Airbus's 'Cabin Vision 2030' flexible cabin configuration include a module designed by students at the University of Cincinnati which features a flying café bar.

Taxi to takeoff:

The emergence of passenger drones or VTOL (Vertical Take-off and Landing) aircraft has seen a new category added to the awards. Uber, in collaboration with Safran Aerospace has entered a fanciful designed space for electric flying taxis.

Uber alles: The flying taxi concept by Safran. Photo / Supplied, Alex Marc, Safran
Uber alles: The flying taxi concept by Safran. Photo / Supplied, Alex Marc, Safran

The herringbone seat pattern allows passengers the best view out of their flying taxi's windows.

Do you design cabins in green?

The Crystal Cabin awards claims that the weight of the cabin interior is "responsible for approx. 5-10% of an aircraft's CO2 emissions". For this reason they have challenged designers and engineers to come up with a "greener cabin".

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Eating green on PriestmanGoode's coconut wood tray-design. Photo / Supplied
Eating green on PriestmanGoode's coconut wood tray-design. Photo / Supplied

One of the more lateral entries to the new award include edible and decomposable catering equipment made from coconut wood and designed by PriestmanGoode.

Sweet dreams:

Better sleep on long-haul flights is the Holy Grail for both cabin designers and passengers. This year's entries feature everything from a 'Sleep Care' app which feeds passengers with sleep and nutrition advice to jetlag reducing cabin lighting.

However the ultimate dream is beds for all: Collins has designed a foldaway bed for crew to get some shuteye in the plane galley.

Shut-eye: Collins' folding beds are there to benefit crew as well as passengers. Photo / Supplied
Shut-eye: Collins' folding beds are there to benefit crew as well as passengers. Photo / Supplied

Adient Aerospace has also created a "Sleep Space" that allows a foldaway bed to be set up for economy passengers sitting at the bulkhead, similar to the Air New Zealand skycouch.

The University of Delft has submitted three separate designs for flying beds, including a triple bunk-bed design.

Adient's Space for All concept design. Photo / Supplied
Adient's Space for All concept design. Photo / Supplied

With Qantas' Project Sunrise and 20-hour flights on the horizon, passengers will take any chance to get a good rest in the skies.

Flush with new ideas:

The days of dreading going to the toilet on a long-haul flight may soon be over.
Airbus has released designs for a self-cleaning toilet. The "dry floor" design means that a vacuum at the bottom of the bowl will hoover up any spilt liquids.

Dry floor: Airbus's toilets will clean themselves. Photo / Supplied
Dry floor: Airbus's toilets will clean themselves. Photo / Supplied