If you're looking for the perfect tipple to inspire your travels, we may have just the tonic.
World Gin Day comes but once a year, on June 8th, and on this day distilleries around the world celebrate the original 'Aqua Vitae'.

Since the small-batch distilling revolution, New Zealand has turned into a nation of gin drinkers.

Wanaka's Pink Gin from the Cardrona Distillery and the Martinborough-based Lighthouse Gin Distillery, both earned places on Lonely Planet's first ever Global Distillery Tour guide.

New Zealand has been recognised as one of the leading destinations for booming gin tourism trend.

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However, if you've whet your whistle on Kiwi Gin there is now an entire travel industry growing up around the international drink.

Gin tourism is now a genuine stimulus for local businesses, with ever more distilleries opening their doors to tourists wanting to experience the process behind their favourite tipple.

Webjet is one such company that is reaping the angel's share of this growth around gin tourism.

"We're seeing people seek out more authentic and immersive experiences," Webjet CEO, David Galt said of his company's food-and-drink centred customers.

Last year the online travel agency saw a 15 per cent growth in domestic gin-related travel within New Zealand and a ten per cent increase in bookings to London – gin capital of the world.

"With a myriad of new distilleries popping up all over the globe, we believe gin tourism will become even bigger in 2019," said Galt.

Japan

Amidst the footie fans travelling to Japan's World Cup, Kiwi travellers are equally keen to fill their boots in the country's burgeoning gin distilleries. Kyoto produced Japans first boutique gin distillery Ki No Bi, in 2016. Since then the country has been consumed by a tsunami of artisanal gin distilleries. In Hiroshima, Sakurao Distillery has begun inviting visitors on distillery tours just 10km away from ground zero.

Top of the Scottish Gin Trail in Aviemore. Photo / Sam Mellish, Getty Images
Top of the Scottish Gin Trail in Aviemore. Photo / Sam Mellish, Getty Images

Scotland

Just think of it as young whiskey. 'Uisge-beatha' is Scots Gaelic for 'water of life'. It is the starting point for any whiskey, straight out the still you might know it better as gin.

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What began as a byproduct of the Scots whiskey boom has become a leading source of Gin. Scotland is the source of world renowned gins such as Gordon's and Tanqueray, as well as newer names like Hendricks which launched in 1999. Though a road less travelled than the whiskey route, there's now a Scottish Gin Trail that leads from Kilmarnock to Elgin.

Quinine: don't rely purely on G&T for anti-malaria medication. Photo / via Getty Images
Quinine: don't rely purely on G&T for anti-malaria medication. Photo / via Getty Images

India

India is the birthplace of the 'gin and tonic'. It was in the cinchona forests of Darjeeling where G first met T. And while tonic water may be just half the story, India is now home to its own up-and-coming gin scene.

Indian tipples such as Hapusa Himalayan Dry Gin, Stranger and Son Gin are an excellent place to start. As an excellent source of quinine it's just what the doctor ordered, though we suggest travellers don't rely purely on G&T for their anti-malaria medication.

Hogarth: In London gin is still affectionately known as 'mothers ruin'. Photo / Creative commons
Hogarth: In London gin is still affectionately known as 'mothers ruin'. Photo / Creative commons

London

London has produced its fair share of world class gin and gin drinkers.There was once a time in the UK capital when gin was cheaper than water. Artist William Hogarth depicted the evils of cheap gin as the greatest problem facing 1730s London. And while the price and quality of London's gin has vastly improved, it's still affectionately known as 'mothers ruin.'

The Ginstitute on Portobello Road offers an experience that is a must for any connoisseur: the chance to blend their own botanical gin.

New Zealand

Don't leave home until you've seen New Zealand's distilleries. There has been an explosion of commercial distilleries over the past 10 years. New Zealand's unique laws on small-scale distilleries have seen many backyard projects grow into celebrated gins. While the size of many of these stills is modest compared to the rest of the world New Zealand punches well above its weight in terms of award-winning tipples.

Best Kiwi Gin Festivals

March

A line-up of New Zealand's leading gin producers along with international craft gins, gin tastings and live discussions.

Ginredible, Bay of Plenty
March

A brand new event for Tauranga, the weekend festival presents a cocktail of gin tastings, masterclasses and live music.

A Celebration of Gin, Bay of Islands
June

Kauri Cliffs has curated a three-day event celebrating the best of Kiwi Gin, declaring New Zealand's current batch as the fruit of a country-wide "ginaissance".