Former policeman and National MP Chester Borrows is set to lose his licence after clocking up too many demerit points from speeding tickets.

Borrows, who is currently heading a Government advisory group tasking with helping reform the criminal justice system, admitted to the Herald today he will lose his licence for three months.

"I'm not a saint. I've had a heavy foot and I'm paying the price for it like anybody else."

Borrows retired as Whanganui's MP in 2017. During his time in politics he was a Minister for Courts and the National Party's spokesman for police.

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He declined to comment about the public's perception to his driving.

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However, the 62-year-old did admit that he was embarrassed about it and would be "very careful from now on".

"I'm embarrassed. I'm aware of our horrific road stats and I'm going to be very careful from now on."

Certain driving offences incur demerit points. If a person accumulates 100 or more demerit points in any two-year period, their licence can be suspended for three months.

At the end of the suspension, the driver will be unlicensed until they've reinstated their licence.

It's not the first time Borrows has been on the wrong side of the law.

He was found not guilty of a charge of careless driving causing injury after driving over the foot of a TPP protestor in Whanganui in March 2016.

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Former policeman and Minister for Courts Chester Borrows has lost his licence for 3 months after clocking up too many demerit points from speeding tickets. Photo / File
Former policeman and Minister for Courts Chester Borrows has lost his licence for 3 months after clocking up too many demerit points from speeding tickets. Photo / File

He and fellow minister Paula Bennett were leaving a breakfast at the Collegiate Motor Inn when they were surrounded by the group of protestors and the incident took place.

Last year, Justice Minister Andrew Little appointed Borrows the chairman of the Safe and Effective Justice Programme Advisory Group - Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora to work alongside justice sector agencies on criminal justice reform.

Borrows, who lives in Hāwera with wife Ella, has been keen to remain working in the justice sector following his retirement.

He became an MP between 2005 and 2017.

Prior to politics, he was a policeman, working in Nelson, Auckand, Wellington and Patea.

He was made a Companion of the Queens Service Order in the 2017 New Year Honours list.

In 1978, he was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct for services in attempting to arrest an armed murderer.