The NRL looks set to continue after the AFL announced a postponement to the Australian rules season today due to the coronavirus pandemic.

NRL, AFL and A-League matches have taken place behind closed doors over the past four days as the only remaining professional sporting competitions continuing in Australia.

The AFL announced this evening that the season has been postponed after one week of action and won't start up again until at least May 31. The AFL women's competition has also been cancelled for 2020.

Australia Rugby League Commission Chairman Peter V'landys however remains confident the NRL should be able to keep going.

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General view during the round one AFL clash between the Gold Coast Suns and the Port Adelaide Power. Photo / Getty
General view during the round one AFL clash between the Gold Coast Suns and the Port Adelaide Power. Photo / Getty

Earlier today Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced all non-essential travel within the country should be cancelled but seemed hopeful about live sport.

Shortly after several Australian states announced borders would be shut.

The number of coronavirus cases in Australia is more than 1200 with seven deaths recorded.

"It should be remembered we're using private charter flights, we're not using normal domestic planes, so hopefully we'll be able to continue to travel even though there's a ban on non-essential travel on commercial airlines," V'landys told Triple M about the domestic travel ban.

"...as I said on Monday, this changes hourly and a decision we make today may change tomorrow. We've prepared for the worst, we've looked at every contingency and we're ready for whatever they throw at us.

"The longer we can go, the better it is. We are still receiving advice from the health authorities and our biosecurity and pandemic expert. By isolating the players, it outs them in a better position. There's less risk. I hope we don't have to suspend the season, it's imperative we play every game."

Facing its biggest financial crisis in our history

AFL CEO Gillon McLachlan said the AFL industry is facing its biggest financial crisis in its history.

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"The decision by various State Governments to close their borders and travel bans and other measures, meant it was time to immediately stop the AFLW and AFL competitions.

"All AFL club training will be suspended while we work with the clubs on the best way to manage players ahead of games being resumed.

"The AFL industry is facing its biggest financial crisis in our history, but our key priority is to do everything possible to keep players, staff and supporters healthy and well through this pandemic," he added.

"Our industry provides livelihoods for thousands and thousands of people, but our key focus at the moment, like every organisation in the country, is to do everything that needs to be done to slow the spread of this virus - to keep people as healthy as possible.

"To say that this is the most serious threat to our game in 100 years is an understatement. It is unprecedented in its impact."

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Earlier the Australian PM said the new travel restrictions shouldn't have an impact on the remaining sporting competitions.

"I would say not. It's not the end of sport," Morrison said.

General view during the round one AFL clash between the Gold Coast Suns and the Port Adelaide Power. Photo / Getty
General view during the round one AFL clash between the Gold Coast Suns and the Port Adelaide Power. Photo / Getty

"We will work closely with them about those arrangements. In terms of the NRL and the AFL and those types of arrangements, I think the principle is important.

"I'm sure we can work with both of those agencies with their respective states and CMOs [chief medical officers] at a federal level," Morrison said.

"If there are new arrangements that need to be put in place to protect the health and safety of everyone they may be possible but I'm not going to pre-empt those outcomes, but I'm sure we can work those issues through on a practical case-by-case basis."

Morrison also mentioned states could announce their own lockdowns, which South Australia Premier Steven Marshall declared moments later. Tasmania, South Australia and the Northern Territory followed suit on Sunday.

South Australia's border will be closed from 4pm Tuesday and all residents must self-isolate for 14 days, Marshall announced. The A-League and AFL both feature Adelaide-based teams.

However, according to the guidelines sports teams are exempt "provided they have approved disease control mechanisms in place" the South Australia Health website said.