Injuries from electric scooter crashes are coming in "fast and furious" as emergency rooms experience a wave of injuries thanks to the motorised two-wheeled machines.

It also comes as ACC confirms there have been as many as 69 electric scooter claims between October 14 and 31.

Fractures, lacerations and abrasions, broken teeth, head injuries and even collapsed lungs are some of the injuries seen by nurses and doctors.

Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) New Zealand faculty chair Dr John Bonning said the wave of injuries was a concern.

Advertisement

"Injuries are coming in fast and furious," Bonning said.

"Our members are reporting a spike in accidents, several quite serious."

Injuries have included fractures, lacerations and abrasions, broken teeth, head injuries and even collapsed lungs.

"The public need to understand these scooters are not toys," Bonning said.

It comes as ACC confirms there have been as many as 69 electric scooter claims between October 14 and 31. Photo / Broadcast Media
It comes as ACC confirms there have been as many as 69 electric scooter claims between October 14 and 31. Photo / Broadcast Media

"They are capable of high speeds, and when ridden on footpaths where there are a high number of pedestrians, they can pose a serious issue to yourself and others.

"My message to the public is: before getting on one, put on a helmet, and importantly know what you are doing."

Bonning said scooter companies also had an obligation to ensure safety for users and other public is a top priority.

"We have seen these shared electric scooters become very popular in a short amount of time since they have been introduced in Auckland and Christchurch," Bonning said.

Advertisement

"We anticipate this popularity will rise as they are introduced across the country, so we want to make sure our elected officials and representatives who are giving them the green light have thought about the regulation of the scooters, from a safety perspective."

On Monday, the Herald reported the number of ACC claims for e-scooter related injuries has almost tripled in the past week, with 38 claims since Lime E-scooters launched in New Zealand.

Now there have been 44 claims in Auckland, 22 in Christchurch city and fewer than four around the rest of the country.

The figures come as 500 more e-scooters were launched in Auckland earlier this week, and more are set to hit the streets next month.

Currently e-scooter riders are allowed to ride without helmets and share the footpath with pedestrians despite travelling at up to 27km/h.

Workplace safety campaigner and early-stage investment fund manager Lance Wiggs earlier told the Herald "someone is going to die" if a number of changes to the road rules weren't made.

The Blind Foundation has expressed concerns that the swift scooters pose a real concern and risk for those who are blind and have low vision.

Auckland Mayor Phil Goff earlier stated he believed there was a serious issue, and wanted a safety report ahead of any major accident.

A spokeswoman for Lime told the Herald it urged riders to practise safe riding by wearing helmets both through notifications on the app and on the actual scooter.

"All our users must abide by all the same city and state laws as if they were operating their own cars, bikes or scooters. This includes laws surrounding the use of mobile phones while travelling.

"While Lime's scooters can reach 25km/h, it is up to the rider to deem what speed is reasonable based off of their surroundings," the spokeswoman said.

Injuries from Electric Scooters

Laceration/puncture/sting: 24 claims

Soft tissue injury: 24 claims

Fracture/dislocation: 17 claims

Concussion/brain injury: Fewer than four claims

Other: Fewer than four claims

Source: ACC