A woman who used sign language to sing to her deaf daughter at a Stan Walker concert has spoken about that special moment, but says it is very much their normal.

Elizabeth Kay was spotted at the Kiwi star's Christchurch concert a couple of weeks ago with her back to the stage, signing to 8-year-old daughter, Natalia, who is a big fan.

"There was one guy who came up to me afterwards and gave me a hug and said: 'I thought that was beautiful'. And it is - it is a beautiful language,'' she said.

The 36-year-old is the only person in her family who is not deaf. Her parents are both deaf and her husband, Barry Kay, is also profoundly deaf.

Advertisement

The couple's two other children - Jayden, 7, and Phoenix, 4 - are also unable to hear. However, the children wear cochlear implants to help them.

"[Sing-signing] is just something that we do, but it's special when people notice."

Elizabeth Kay is captured sing-singing to her deaf daughter Natalia, 8, at a Stan Walker concert in Christchurch. Image / Fender Maeva
Elizabeth Kay is captured sing-singing to her deaf daughter Natalia, 8, at a Stan Walker concert in Christchurch. Image / Fender Maeva

Kay is studying to be a teacher but works as a freelance New Zealand sign language interpreter, translating for the deaf community at all sorts of events.

She said she loved promoting sign language as it encouraged inclusivity and also allowed for a greater use of expression when communicating.

She and Natalia, as well as another mum and her deaf daughters, were heading to the Walker concert and put in an inquiry to see if an interpreter could stand on stage for them.

But the request was too last-minute to be accommodated, so Kay said she was happy to do it for the girls, so they too could enjoy the concert.

"We are definitely Stan Walker fans. We love his songs and his song was one of our favourite songs to sing-sign.

"It just puts them all on an equal level,'' she said.

Advertisement

Kay also teaches a special sing-signing choir for a group of deaf students, including her daughter Natalia.

The 8-year-old has been sing-signing for a number of years and even signed the national anthem at the recent Silver Ferns netball match against the Diamonds in Christchurch.

Kay said her little girl loved music and was gearing up to perform with her sing-sign choir at a special performance tomorrow.

The event is being held at the van Asch Deaf Education Centre at 3pm and Kay invited the public to come along to see the group in action.

Elizabeth Kay, 36, with daughter Natalia Kay, 8, who is deaf. Photo / Supplied
Elizabeth Kay, 36, with daughter Natalia Kay, 8, who is deaf. Photo / Supplied