When Lt. Craig Cardinale got to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School as a mass shooting was unfolding last year, he found Deputy Scot Peterson pacing outside, repeating, "Oh, my God. Oh, my God."

The deputy, who was assigned to the school, was behaving in ways typically associated with fear or panic, the lieutenant told investigators. He was moving "back and forth," talking to himself and "breathing heavily."

What he was not doing was what the prevailing law enforcement protocol says was his first responsibility: Go into the building. Stop the gunman.

Peterson has been castigated and, as of this week,

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