If you have always enjoyed the thought of cruising, but not enjoyed the stomach-churning prospect of the high seas – Aurora Expeditions have launched an unusual looking ship that could be just the one for you.

Debuting on October 31 the cutting-edge prow is designed to cut through chop and keep the ship steady in the roughest of seas.

Part bird - part boat: The X bow has an unusual profile. Photo / Supplied
Part bird - part boat: The X bow has an unusual profile. Photo / Supplied

Dubbed the X-Bow the Greg Mortimer will be the first ship to incorporate the feature. Named after an Aussie Antarctic explorer who first conquered pole's highest mountain, the Mortimer will spend most of its time on expeditions into Antarctic waters.

The bizarre, beak-like prow slopes down into the water giving it the appearance of a giant polar bird.

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The X-bow has featured on Arctic survey vessesl. Photo / Supplied
The X-bow has featured on Arctic survey vessesl. Photo / Supplied

Otherwise known as an inverted bow, the design has previously been used on deep sea oil service ships and survey ships.

Instead of gliding up and over the waves, like a traditional ship, the low prow cuts into the chop to slice through rough Antarctic seas.

The result is a smoother, calmer sail for passengers.

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The concept which was first coined by Norwegian shipwrights ULSTEIN come into being in 2005, but the Mortimer is the first cruise ship to be built with the striking new profile.

The Greg Mortimet arrives in Ushuaia. Photo / Supplied
The Greg Mortimet arrives in Ushuaia. Photo / Supplied

The company Aurora are hoping it will be the perfect expedition vessel for getting passengers to the wildest parts of the planet in the highest comfort.

"We can't change the weather forecast, but what we do have a say in is how our ships are designed and built to take on the roughest parts of the Southern and Arctic Ocean," says Aurora Expeditions.

"The bow penetrates the waves in a way where the water gently flows over the bow – reducing impact and slamming loads."

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Inside the unusual-looking vessel is plenty of space for a restaurant and observation deck, and plenty of kit for adventures such as ski touring and zodiac expeditions.

The Mortimer will be sailing to the Antarctic Peninsular and South Shetland Islands from Ushuaia, Argentina on 13 day itineraries.