Could this be your chance to be paid to move to a Greek paradise?

Greece's islands have an almost mythical obsession with youth.

Each year young families and holidaymakers arrive from around the world to bask on the paradise islands.

The beaches and whitewashed buildings give the impression of an eternal summer holiday that has been going since the Hellenic era.

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Yet the native populations of the Aegean have been ageing, and the youth leaving in droves.

Elysium: Antikythera taps into natural beauty to draw new blood to the island. Photo / Getty Images
Elysium: Antikythera taps into natural beauty to draw new blood to the island. Photo / Getty Images

One such island seeking much needed rejuvenation is Antikythera.

Sat between Crete and Kythira, the island has been suffering from under population for years.

In spite of the blue waters and ageless charm, according to the LA Times the population of Antikythera is now just 20.

This is why the Greek Orthodox Church is sponsoring young families to move to the island. While the local diocese is giving preference to Greek citizens, all eligible applicants will be considered.

The chosen settlers will be provided with a plot of land, a new life and a monthly stipend of €500 ($850).

The breathtaking shoreline of Antikythera could be yours to call home. Photo / Getty Images
The breathtaking shoreline of Antikythera could be yours to call home. Photo / Getty Images

So far four families have been selected to live on the island.

Antikythera is seeking an injection of young blood to keep the economy and population healthy. With a ferry from Crete and mainland Greece, Antikythera is remote yet not too far flung.

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Eternal youth: Statues found on the island of Antikythera. Photo / Getty Images
Eternal youth: Statues found on the island of Antikythera. Photo / Getty Images

Currently there is a distinct lack of tourism on the island, but this could be a good thing for those seeking peace and quiet on their own Greek island.

In spite of a lack of visitors, Antikythera is not without charms and historical curios.

The sea is littered with 2000 year old shipwrecks and treasures from antiquity.

Startup: The Antikythera mechanism from 205 BC, is the world's oldest computer. Photo / Getty Images
Startup: The Antikythera mechanism from 205 BC, is the world's oldest computer. Photo / Getty Images

The world's oldest mechanical computer was discovered here. Dated to the second century BC, the machine was used to predict the movements of the stars.

Antikythera has been the cradle of invention before. Perhaps with the influx of new people and new ideas the island might reinvent itself again?