Whether you are a "Bieber Lieber" or can't stand the chipmunk-voiced Canadian pop star, there is no denying that the singer inspires a worldwide following.

Unfortunately for one unassuming valley in Iceland, this following is surprisingly heavy footed.

The Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon – pronounced Fya-thraur-klyoo-ver – is located in south east Iceland and as of last week it has been blocked off from visitors.

Fjaðrárgljúfur: The beautifuly mossy canyon which featured in Bieber's video has been closed to the public. Photo / Getty Images
Fjaðrárgljúfur: The beautifuly mossy canyon which featured in Bieber's video has been closed to the public. Photo / Getty Images

A write up in the Lonely Planet pointed the finger squarely at the musician for the beauty spot's defilement by hype-chasing millennials.

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70 kilometres from Vik, the canyon was previously off the beaten track.

With a hundred metre waterfall and mossy paths cut into the sheer, peaty cliff faces, it's a spectacular location.

The natural beauty saw it feature as the backdrop to the 2015 music video for Justin Bieber's single "I'll show you".

The single which peaked at number 6 in the US Billboard charts over Christmas 2015, has since attracted 440,726,969 views for its video.

It has also lead to an increased profile for the landmark and subsequent tourism boom that has culminated in Umhverfis Stofnun (the Icelandic Environment Agency) closing all public access to the site.

Between 2017 and 2018 visitors to the canyon almost doubled from 150000 to 282000.

According to the notice on the agency's website the vegetation has been damaged by heavy foot traffic and tourists trampling the grass to avoid the muddy pathways.

For this reason no one will be able to visit the spot for the next three months, giving it time to repair and reganerate its fragile moss.

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But is Bieber to blame?

Singled out: Many were quick to blame the singer for wrecking the Iceland's natural treasures. Photo / Supplied
Singled out: Many were quick to blame the singer for wrecking the Iceland's natural treasures. Photo / Supplied

Speaking to CNN Travel, Inga Hlin Palsdottir, the director of Visit Iceland says it's not fair to pin the closure on the pop star or his followers.

"It's just a natural wonder that wasn't meant to be that popular," she said. "We need to build a better infrastructure there so we can invite people all year round. We need paths that can be discovered all year round. It's not only because of nature, it's a safety issue."

Although this is the longest planned closure, extended until June 1, there was a similar tourist shut-out last year.

'I'll Show You': Justin Bieber strips down to take a dip in an icy lake while filming in Iceland. Photo / Bragi Kort, Getty Images
'I'll Show You': Justin Bieber strips down to take a dip in an icy lake while filming in Iceland. Photo / Bragi Kort, Getty Images

According to the Icelandic Tourist Board since the 2015 and the year of the music video there has been an 80% increase in foreign tourists visiting the island - from 1.3 million to 2.32 million tourists coming to Iceland from around the world.

While the music video put the spotlight on Fjaðrárgljúfur, Iceland as a whole has been coping with an unprecedented tourism boom.

Like any country struggling with a huge spike in visitors it has many questions to answer.

Where this popularity came from or who is "to blame" are the least pressing.

Dyrhólaey: The 2015 video featured a number of beauty spots in south Iceland. Photo / Supplied
Dyrhólaey: The 2015 video featured a number of beauty spots in south Iceland. Photo / Supplied

Instead, they should be considering more practical matters, says Hannes Sasi Palsson, a tourism worker based in Reykjavik.

"We have to ask ourselves whether we want to build viewing platforms, charge entry or simply close the area down for a few months a year, giving it time to heal. It's a debate that any country coming to grips with a massive increase in tourism has to grapple with," he told CNN.

Next month the Faroe Isles, another archipelago in the North Atlantic plans to shut out visitors.

Fjaðrá: The refreshing scenery and breathtaking lanscape were a hit with Bieber fans. Photo / Supplied
Fjaðrá: The refreshing scenery and breathtaking lanscape were a hit with Bieber fans. Photo / Supplied

"Over the weekend of 26-27 April, major tourism sights in the Faroe Islands will be closed," read the statement from Faroe Island tourism body.

Instead it will be running free working holidays to the first 100 volunteers to join work parties for people to build up paths and future proof the island's tourism spots.