Holidays can teach us many things — about a destination, about other people and about ourselves.

MARK DYE

The dirtiest places serve the most delicious food.

Time and time again I find myself reaffirming the above statement. From the streets of Bangkok (although I heard they were trying to ban street food there?), to more recently the dimly lit, grubby restaurants of Lautoka in Fiji, it seems the dirtier the place, the more delicious the food. My mantra is, if it is good enough for the locals, it's good enough for me. The downside of this is that you sometimes have to eat in some less than satisfactory environments, but the upside is incredibly delicious food that always seems to be a tenth of the price of the really clean place. I just wish I could be back in Lautoka now at this Chinese restaurant eating their deep-fried tofu — like nothing else I have ever experienced, or at one of the bus stops in Cambodia eating a noodle soup. Dogs in NZ live in cleaner kennels, but man, talk about delicious.

Advertisement

• Mark Dye hosts Heartbreak Island, Tuesdays on TVNZ2 and TVNZ OnDemand


SAJEELA KERSHI

The Kershi Klan travel hasn't always been easy. My grandparents made the treacherous journey from India to Pakistan during the Partition, the biggest refugee crisis of its time.

Inherurgency to get to safety, my great grandmother grabbed what she could: food, shawl and a brass jug (which I inherited). They travelled day and night by foot then train.

I was born In Pakistan — my family migrated to Germany by plane. My mother packed things from the life we were leaving behind. Traditional clothes, spices and a marble rolling pin (which I also inherited). However, our new home would be only a temporary one for couple of years. A road trip around Europe was planned, which would see us settling permanently in the UK.

Comedian Sajeela Kershi.
Comedian Sajeela Kershi.

My siblings and I spent most of the journey in the back of a white van (just like the Scooby Doo Van). With limited room, we had to leave our favourite toys in favour of clothing, 6000 cigarettes (don't ask) and a traditional German beer tankard (which I also inherited).

I've learned from my family travels to not pack too much, that it's okay to pack the odd random future heirloom in your suitcase from loved ones as it will be a story to tell and something to pass down. That travel — be it via trains, planes or automobiles — is rich in possibilities yet to be explored. I cannot wait for the new exciting adventures I'll experienceon my New Zealand tour.

• A British Asian comedian of Muslim heritage, Sajeela's show Fights Like A Girl! was written after she was a key speaker at the UK's Global Women's March. She performs in Auckland at Garnet Station as part of Auckland Fringe Festival, from February 27 to March 3.