It's the soundtrack to many an African safari or adventure holiday. Walking though the sands of the Namib Desert, you'd be forgiven for thinking you can hear Toto's hit single Africa caught on the wind. Chances are you aren't imagining it.

The continent's oldest desert has been gifted a sound installation featuring the 80's soft rock hit.

Artist Max Siedentopf from Namibia was obsessed by the idea and the song, calling it "probably the most popular song of the last four decades."

The single went quadruple platinum in its release in 1982 and keeps having fitful returns to music charts. Africa was the most streamed song of 2017, clocking up 440 million views on Youtube.

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Siedentopf explains on his artist's website that the "installation consists of 6 speakers which are attached to an MP3 player that only has one song on it."

"The song is put on loop and the installation runs on solar batteries to keep Toto going for all eternity."

Eternity: The speakers are powered by solar energy and designed for durability. Photo / Supplied
Eternity: The speakers are powered by solar energy and designed for durability. Photo / Supplied

The 27-year-old artist "wanted to pay the song the ultimate homage and physically exhibit Africa in Africa," he revealed in an interview with the BBC.

While Namibians love it others have called it the "worst sound installation ever."

But Siedentopf seems to be enjoying the mixed reception.

It was intended to be an eternal tribute, with the set up designed to be as durable as possible – but even Toto might not outlast the sands of the Namib.

Only the most dedicated of Toto fans will be able to find the artwork.

The installation is located somewhere in the 80,000-square-kilometre desert. Photo / Supplied
The installation is located somewhere in the 80,000-square-kilometre desert. Photo / Supplied

One clue left by Siedentopf as to its whereabouts is a map detailing the "approximate location of the installation" as somewhere in the 81,000-square-kilometre expanse of sand which spans three countries.

Meanwhile, it will be out there somewhere, playing in the 55 million year old desert.