Eli Orzessek looks at some of Asia's most eye-opening celebrations.

1 MONKEY BUFFET FESTIVAL, THAILAND

In Thailand's Lopburi province, macaque monkeys are worshipped as they bring tourism to the area. As such, every year they're treated to a massive feast of their favourite foods . Giant towers of delicacies — including meat, fruit, icecream, soda and othertreats—are piled among the ruins of the Phra Prang Sam Yot temple. Dancers in monkey costumes open the ceremony, before over 600 macaques leap in and stuff their faces.

2 KANAMARA MATSURI, JAPAN

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The pink phallic-shaped 'Mikoshi' floats through the streets during Kanamara Matsuri festival in Kawasaki, Japan. Photo / Getty Images
The pink phallic-shaped 'Mikoshi' floats through the streets during Kanamara Matsuri festival in Kawasaki, Japan. Photo / Getty Images

Japan is known for its numerous festivals, but this has got to be one of the weirdest.
Known as the "Penis Festival", Kanamara Matsuri is an enthusiastic celebration of the birds and the bees. Taking place every April at Kanayama Shrine in Kawasaki, locals pray for fertility, smooth marital relationships and business prosperity — and it's also become a highlight of the LGBT social calendar. On the day of the festival, participants can visit the shrine and buy penis-shaped souvenirs and sweets, while giant phalluses are marched through the street during the parade.


3 OMED-OMEDAN, INDONESIA

Young couples take part in the kissing festival, locally known as Omed-omedan, in Banjar Kaja Sesetan in Bali. Photo / Getty Images
Young couples take part in the kissing festival, locally known as Omed-omedan, in Banjar Kaja Sesetan in Bali. Photo / Getty Images

While Indonesia can be a conservative country, the locals let it all go for this annual mass kissing festival in the village of Banjar Kaja Sesetan in Bali. Held on the first day of the new year, the name Omed-Omedan translates to mean "pull-pull". The crowd of unmarried youths aged from 17 to 30 is divided by gender, with the groups facing each other on the main street. Afterasignal from a Hindu leader, both sides approach the centre of the road. Then the male participants pull the female participants in for a pash, while other villages pour buckets of water overthem. Apparently it's a great place to find a partner, with many couples meeting through this tradition.