It doesn't have to be perfect wave conditions to surf.

Raglan man Armie Armstrong proved this today when he and a couple of mates surfed in the Auckland Harbour at lunchtime.

Armstrong, who has been producing his own surfing hydrofoil system for 12 months, said having a foil on the board meant he could ride the waves even if they weren't that good.

Raglan's Armie Armstrong carves it up in Auckland Harbour today using a surfboard fitted with a hydrofoil. Photo / Doug Sherring
Raglan's Armie Armstrong carves it up in Auckland Harbour today using a surfboard fitted with a hydrofoil. Photo / Doug Sherring

"Today it was about 25 knots of wind south-west coming down the harbour so that was basically pushing up enough wind cells so I could just ride the energy of the wind swell with the foil."

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His business, Armstrong Foils, supplies foils to Jimmy Spithill who uses it for hydrofoil surfing for fun and to attune himself to how they work, and it is also used by world champion surfer John John Florence during training.

Armstrong said today's 25-knot south-west wind coming down the harbour pushed up enough wind cells to ride the energy of the wind swell with the foil. Photo / Doug Sherring
Armstrong said today's 25-knot south-west wind coming down the harbour pushed up enough wind cells to ride the energy of the wind swell with the foil. Photo / Doug Sherring

The foil was even popular with Hawaiian celebrity water sports enthusiast Kai Lenny who caught 11 waves in continuous motion while using one last year, featured in the video above shot at North Shore, Oahu, Hawaii, while riding an Armstrong 1600.

"The beauty about hydrofoiling is just the sensation is really floating. Basically you are flying a wing in the water and I guess the closest thing you could compare it to is riding in perfect waist-deep powder. On a windy choppy day in Auckland Harbour you are basically on a powder run."

Armstrong said the foil system could be used on a kite surf, stand up paddle board, wake board and surf board - depending on a person's skill level.

Armstrong Foils has a stand at the Auckland on Water Boat Show at the Viaduct this weekend where they would be doing demos and selling the foil system to people with boats so they can tow it and wakefoil (rather than wakesurf) the boat's wake.

Raglan surfer Armie Armstrong carves it up in Auckland Harbour with a bit of help from a jet ski. Photo / Doug Sherring
Raglan surfer Armie Armstrong carves it up in Auckland Harbour with a bit of help from a jet ski. Photo / Doug Sherring
Armstrong leaves his tow behind. He says the closest thing you could compare hydrofoil surfing to is like riding in perfect waist-deep powder. Photo / Doug Sherring
Armstrong leaves his tow behind. He says the closest thing you could compare hydrofoil surfing to is like riding in perfect waist-deep powder. Photo / Doug Sherring