Clowning around isn't just for children, in fact, it's possible to make a career out of being silly.

Three years ago Stephen Witt was working at a "really boring" job at a steel manufacturing company, when he realised he needed a change of pace.

"I was going to start a career in stand-up comedy and I thought clowning would be a good parallel to that."

A childhood friend of Mr Witt owned his own clowning company, Cornflake's Magic World, and Mr Witt decided he wanted in too.

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"I knew it would totally diversify my world ... I knew it was going to be really for me. It unlocks all these new parts of who you are."

For Mr Witt, clowning has taught him patience and brought him joy.

"A lot of people assume clowns are a bit sad or a bit lonely ...

"I think there's an element of truth to that but with the kind of clowning I'm doing, being a kids' entertainer, it's pretty special.

"Some moments are so lovely you just can't be down. You get to see the most precious and beautiful side of kids and that brings a lot of joy into my life."

Mr Witt said he always had an affinity with performing and wanted to build on his natural abilities for comedy and acting.

His clown character, Popcorn, shares some of his characteristics, and he said he worked hard to balance cheekiness and kindness.

"If you're going to give a kid a hard time, you've got to make them feel comfortable as well.

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"By nature I'm quite kind and really cheeky, so I suppose ... and cute, I'm a cute guy, I've heard this my whole life. Our costumes are designed to emphasise parts of us anyway so I'm a very cute clown, but then I say the buzziest stuff."

Mr Witt said working as a clown gave him insights into human nature and the human condition, which helped inform his stand-up material.

"Comedy is a beautiful thing like that, it can unlock things in someone you didn't know were there. Sometimes the things kids say is just ridiculous or uncanny and the parents just can't get over it."

While Mr Witt hoped to cement a career in stand-up, clowning was "a young man's game."

"[I won't be] an old wrinkly, crusty clown. I'll definitely be hanging up my hat before I'm 30. You need to look fresh ... you've got to pop."