Wellington Stadium CEO Shane Harmon wants to host a trans-Tasman football match to raise money to support those affected in the devastating bush fires in Australia.

Harmon said the stadium – which has recently been renamed Sky Sport Stadium – will cover all game-day costs involved in staging the match.

That would include rent, security, cleaning and power, and would be a six figure sum if the match was well-attended.

"We are two countries that always come together in times of crisis and I believe sport could have a huge role to play in that," said Harmon. "It could be a men's or women's international.

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"The sporting world is crying out for more trans-Tasman football so it would be very well-received and we would love to play a small part."

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An Australian journalist writing for the SBS website on Friday raised the idea of a clash between the All Whites and the Socceroos, which led Harmon to see what could be possible.

He has already contacted both national federations.

"The answer so far is not a no, but everyone fully acknowledges the logistical challenge of pulling together squads at short notice. I don't think anything is going to happen immediately, but the idea is out there and it has been positively received."

It would be extremely difficult to arrange a fixture between the All Whites and Socceroos.

The teams haven't met since 2011 and last played in New Zealand in 2002.

Because of the costs involved, the All Whites are rarely sighted on home soil. They've played here four times since 2015 – all World Cup qualifying fixtures – and their last friendly here was in 2015.

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A more realistic idea could be a clash between national squads made up solely of A-League players.

A women's match, between the Football Ferns and the Matildas, would also be more feasible, as they have met four times in the last five years.

Harmon's initiative is one of many current efforts by sportspeople and sports organisations being mooted and implemented to help those affected by the Australian bush fires.

Australian tennis star Nick Kyrgios has promised to donate AU$200 to the bush fire appeal for every ace he hits in all tournaments this summer.

He then broke down in tears after winning his opening match against Germany's Jan-Lennard Struff in impressive style.

"I don't really care about the praise too much. We've got the ability and the platform to do something. My home town is Canberra and we've got the most toxic air in the world at the moment, that's pretty sad. It's tough. Sorry."

Teammates Alex de Minaur and Sam Stosur followed suit, pledging their own commitment to help the cause while Tennis Australia announced a "Rally for Relief" exhibition match on Rod Laver Arena on Wednesday January 15 that they hope will attract the world's best players.

The New Zealand Breakers have also joined the cause by pledging NZ$1000 for every three-point shot the side lands against the Melbourne Phoenix on Sunday. Club owner Matt Walsh will then match the team's donation.

Menwhile Big Bash League captains, Brisbane Heat's Chris Lynn and Melbourne Stars' Glenn Maxwell as well as Hurricanes batsman D'Arcy Short, have all pledged AU$250 for each six they hit in the remainder the competition.