All Blacks third-string halfback Brad Weber has provided a glance at the raging power of Typhoon Hagibis over the weekend as it passed over Japan.

The 28-year-old caught lights in the team hotel rocking back-and-forth as the typhoon, which killed more than a dozen people, passed over.

"Typhoon winds so strong it's pushing our hotel around," he captioned the post on Twitter.

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Hotel staff and another person in the video could be seen chatting away over the counter without taking too much notice of the rocking lights above them.

An earthquake also struck near Tokyo on the weekend and some people suggested the shaking might have caused the lamps to sway. "Shouldn't be a worry to the Wellington guys!" one Twitter user joked.

Typhoon Hagibis made landfall south of Tokyo and moved northward, leaving at least 19 people dead with more than a dozen missing.

Three matches were cancelled by Rugby World Cup organisers over the weekend, including the All Blacks v Italy match scheduled for Saturday night.

Organisers later decided it was safe enough for the tournament host to play Scotland at Yokohama on Sunday night.

Scotland had threatened to sue the organisers if the game was cancelled, as the Northern Hemisphere team needed a win to reach the knockout stages.

However, the Brave Blossoms managed to out the Scots, defeating them 28-21 to make it to the knockout stages for the first time ever.

All Blacks halfback Brad Weber. Photo / Mark Mitchell
All Blacks halfback Brad Weber. Photo / Mark Mitchell

The win resulted in Ireland dropping to second on the ladder of Pool A, setting up an interesting run to the finals.

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In a quarter-final matchup few would have predicted, Ireland will face the All Blacks on Saturday at 11.15pm.

Bundee Aki, who was red-carded for a high tackle in the match, would need the luck of the Irish if he was to be allowed to play again this World Cup.

Previous dismissals at the World Cup have resulted in three-match suspensions.

In a desperate act to keep the former Chiefs centre's World Cup alive, a specialist lawyer from Ireland was called in to defend him at Aki's hearing.

Rows of Japan's bullet trains sit in a pool of water in Nagano. Photo / AP
Rows of Japan's bullet trains sit in a pool of water in Nagano. Photo / AP
A baseball stadium is flooded after Typhoon Hagibis, in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. Photo / AP
A baseball stadium is flooded after Typhoon Hagibis, in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. Photo / AP

Flights and train services were also cancelled throughout the weekend due to the weather, with 27,000 military troops deployed to assist other rescue crews.

And while it was hardly the way Canada wanted to finish their World Cup campaign, the players delivered the feel-good off-field story of the tournament.

The side traded footballs for shovels and brooms to help the local community in Kamaishi to recover from the debilitating events of the week.

"We're just trying our very small part to help them in any way we can," Canada fly-half Peter Nelson said.

"In times like this there are an awful lot more important things than rugby, and when we got here we saw people's houses absolutely destroyed, water (rising) up the walls."

- Additional reporting from AP