The All Blacks' physicality in their opening World Cup victory over the Springboks has again been called into question after footage was uncovered of prop Joe Moody in at least two separate incidents of perceived foul play.

In the first of these, Moody can be seen making contact with the back of Boks hooker Malcolm Marx's head in a no-arms tackle.

In the 15th minute, as All Blacks flanker Ardie Savea is stripping the ball out of the grip of Marx, Moody comes in late and high with no arms to collect the Springboks hooker in the back of the neck.

Joe Moody collects Malcolm Marx in the back of the head. Photo / Spark Sport
Joe Moody collects Malcolm Marx in the back of the head. Photo / Spark Sport

Marx received a visit from the team doctor before continuing, with the incident seemingly going unnoticed by the referees and the citing commissioner.

Moody was later caught pushing a forearm into the face of Springboks No 8 Duane Vermeulen, leading to a brief scuffle, while several South African fans believed he should have been penalised at scrum time.

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Ardie Savea is tackled high by Pieter-Steph du Toit. Photo / Spark Sport
Ardie Savea is tackled high by Pieter-Steph du Toit. Photo / Spark Sport

They weren't the only incidents that went unnoticed, with a review of the Cup clash revealing other questionable missed calls early in the contest.

In the 11th minute, Savea is seemingly tackled in a neck roll by Du Toit. "Has him high around the neck, no call on that," said Spark Sport commentator Scotty Stevenson.

Ardie Savea is tackled high by Pieter-Steph du Toit. Photo / Spark Sport
Ardie Savea is tackled high by Pieter-Steph du Toit. Photo / Spark Sport

Shortly after, a long Aaron Smith pass bounces and Du Toit runs through and attempts to kick the ball ahead. Instead, he seemingly finds contact with Sam Cane's head. Cane would later fail an HIA and wouldn't return in the second half.

Du Toit attempts to kick the ball but looks to collect Sam Cane in the head. Photo / Spark Sport
Du Toit attempts to kick the ball but looks to collect Sam Cane in the head. Photo / Spark Sport
Sam Cane remains down after the collision for Du Toit. Photo / Spark Sport
Sam Cane remains down after the collision for Du Toit. Photo / Spark Sport

Boks coach Rassie Erasmus thought the penalty count was 11-2 in the All Blacks' favour, but it was in fact 9-4.

"Discipline was always going to be a massive thing for us," Read said afterwards. "The South Africans put pressure on through penalties and when you've got a kicker like [Handre] Pollard – he can kick from 50m. It was a conscious decision from us not to give away too many penalties. We probably haven't been that smart throughout the whole year but we were at a different level today."

The All Blacks had claims themselves to be disappointed with the officials as referee Garces failed to show a yellow card to Boks left wing Makazole Mapimpi after he didn't roll away from his try-saving tackle on Richie Mo'unga, therefore stopping the All Blacks from winning quick ball in a threatening position.

"On another day it probably would have been a yellow card," All Blacks coach Steve Hansen said yesterday. "I think Jerome would probably admit that himself, but as I've said many times, they're going to make mistakes and you just have to live with it. We've had our share where they've gone against us and we've had our share where they've gone with us."

Overall Hansen was happy with his team's discipline. "It's a big tick really because we haven't been that good at it pre-tournament," he said. "It was a big focus and we did well."

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There was other media criticism of Garces.

James Richardson of TheSouthAfrican.com said Garces was clueless at scrum-time.

"The Springboks lost their early momentum in the match against the All Blacks due, in part, to Frenchman Jerome Garces' stunning ignorance of the dark arts of the scrum.

"For the first three scrums, Joe Moody's elbow went straight into the turf, but Garces completely missed it. Later in the match, he would award the All Blacks a penalty despite Ofa Tuungafasi over-extending into a virtual belly flop to bring a scrum down in their half.

"Garces made at least one borderline call in favour of the Springboks, but that call was arguably incorrect and Makazole Mapimpi should probably have gone to the bin for conceding the penalty that allowed the All Blacks to level the scores. "


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