COMMENT:

He said, she said.

That's the word from Camp Crusaders as the official investigation begins into this latest round of post-match South African shenanigans.

I say that because since pro rugby began there's been a succession of unsavoury off-field incidents involving New Zealand players, from the infamous Roger Randle allegations in 1997 to the U-20s being shot at in 2002.

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Who knows what really went down with George Bridge and Richie Mo'unga, the reality being that in all such occasions truth often lies somewhere between the various versions offered and proffered.

What is certain is that another highly qualified lawyer has (again) been brought in to uncover, or not, the truth.

I remain dubious because the first thing lawyers always do is protect reputations, both theirs and their client's.

However independent the investigation might be seen to be, one thing already guaranteed is that it'll never produce damning or guilty verdicts against those accused - because that's not what it's purpose actually is.

And if you scorn my scepticism then re-read New Zealand Rugby's report into the Chiefs Strippergate from a few years back.

Extensive rigorous examination of all the evidence that time concluded that the worst of the behaviour belonged to the then 70-year-old bus driver.

Yes, it was him who threw gravel at her and physically and verbally abused her while all those big burly sober rugby players stood around helpless to intervene.

Remarkable reading if you want a good laugh with about as much connection to reality as the Game of Thrones.

Now I'm not saying George Bridge and those other Crusader players/management people did anything wrong.

George Bridge was involved in an incident in a McDonald's in Cape Town following the Crusaders' Super Rugby match against the Stormers. Photo / Photosport
George Bridge was involved in an incident in a McDonald's in Cape Town following the Crusaders' Super Rugby match against the Stormers. Photo / Photosport

They were in a McDonalds late at night after drinking however much they'd drunk wanting to take selfies with other unsuspecting patrons.

Perfectly normal behaviour when you're out late at night in a country as safe as South Africa.

As for Mo'unga, the accusations against him are quite concerning. I really hope for his sake that he didn't spit beer or pinch anyone's bottom.

The fact he's supposedly apologised via Instagram is damning enough.

As for his admission that he "can't remember anything about it" - what is it with sport stars in trouble who all tend to suffer from instant temporary amnesia?

Now I don't want to deliberately connect any dots between this and any ongoing CTE/concussion issues but the inference is fairly obvious.

What a strange world we live in where this stuff dominates the "news" for days on end.

Ultimately it all comes down to varying versions of events, i.e. He said/She said. It's not about who you believe, more like who's truth you choose to.