The fallout of an explosive week in politics remains unknown, with Botany MP Jami-Lee Ross hospitalised for mental health issues.

Yesterday the Herald reported Ross had been sectioned to an Auckland mental health facility.

Ross was picked up by police on Sunday, and a source close to the former National MP told the Herald that he was "not in good shape" and "had been sectioned ... people who go willingly aren't sectioned".

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Jami-Lee Ross 'sectioned' to mental health facility

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Under the Mental Health Act, a person can be taken to a safe place against their will and given treatment if their safety is considered at risk.

"He feels terribly alone. He hasn't been home," the source said.

Newstalk ZB's political editor Barry Soper said Ross had obviously been "under a lot pressure" and did not believe the MP's party was instrumental in his hospitalisation.

Soper told Newstalk ZB it was "a bit rich" for the National Party to say it took the mental health concerns seriously in a week that had seen both sides engage in allegations and counter claims.

"They are both victims in this."

Ross had revealed earlier this week he had suffered something akin to a nervous breakdown and had been under care, Soper said.

"[It was] certainly a bit rich for the National Party to now be saying 'look we take these mental health concerns very seriously indeed'.

"Of course anyone takes mental health concerns seriously, but to suggest that it was National that got him the help that he obviously so desperately needed I think is a bit rich."

Former Labour Party president Mike Williams told TVNZ that he believed things would go quiet from Ross for at least five days, as per Williams' understanding of the Mental Health Act.

Former National Party president Michelle Boag told TVNZ there were still questions to be answered and nobody was quite sure where the incredibly fast-moving story would go next.

Earlier this week, Ross was pinpointed by a PwC report as leaking National Party Leader Simon Bridges' travel expenses.

Ross disputed the findings and accused Bridges of corruption before unleashing a secretly recorded phone call in which the leader disparaged one of their own MPs - describing Maureen Pugh as "f***ing useless".

Bridges apologised to Pugh shortly after the tape was released.

Ross proceeded to quit the National Party as he was ousted from the caucus and began trading insults with party leaders.

The political scandal only grew when six women came forward accusing Ross of bullying and harassment.

Ross denied harassing the women but publicly admitted on air to extra-martial affairs, saying he owed his wife a huge apology.

WHERE TO GET HELP:

If you are worried about your or someone else's mental health, the best place to get help is your GP or local mental health provider. However, if you or someone else is in danger or endangering others, call 111.

• Lifeline: 0800 543 354 (available 24/7)

• Suicide Crisis Helpline: 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO) (available 24/7)

• Youthline: 0800 376 633

• Kidsline: 0800 543 754 (available 24/7)

• Whatsup: 0800 942 8787 (1pm to 11pm)

• Depression helpline: 0800 111 757 (available 24/7)

If it is an emergency and you feel like you or someone else is at risk, call 111.

There are lots of places to get support. For others, click here.​