Police officers around New Zealand are paying their respects to slain officer Constable Matthew Hunt today.

A minute's silence has been observed in honour of Hunt, who died in the line of duty last Friday morning on Reynella Drive, Massey, West Auckland.

Hunt died of his injuries, and another officer was injured, when the pair were shot while carrying out a routine traffic stop at 10.37am.

More than 100 people this morning gathered in the Henderson Police Station car park, all staunchly and quietly, only speaking - if at all - to the person beside them.

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Many of them were in police uniform, others in normal clothing. Some members of the public gathered outside too.

Police embrace at this morning's service. Photo / Dean Purcell
Police embrace at this morning's service. Photo / Dean Purcell

At the end of the minute's silence, one officer started singing Hallelujah, by Leonard Cohen.

Some uniformed officers could be seen crying after the short service, sharing hugs with one another.

Hundreds of flowers and messages of support towards the police and the Hunt family have been placed at the base of flag poles outside the station.

"Thank you for sacrificing your life for all," one message says.

People place flowers outside the Henderson Police Station a week to the day police officer Matt Hunt was killed. Photo / Dean Purcell
People place flowers outside the Henderson Police Station a week to the day police officer Matt Hunt was killed. Photo / Dean Purcell

"From a mother to a man in blue, our hearts are with you," said another.

The New Zealand and New Zealand Police flags flew at half mast.

Walking up to the tributes you could smell the flowers. The area had a sombre feel; eerily quiet apart from the clanging of metal against metal as the flags flew in the cool south westerly wind. It was partly cloudy over Henderson but the sun tried hard to pierce through the clouds.

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Police gather at this morning's service. Photo / Dean Purcell
Police gather at this morning's service. Photo / Dean Purcell

A poem written for Hunt was at the base of the flag poles, alongside a picture of black boots and a police hat.

The poem read:

"These boots have seen tragedy

They have seen sorrow

They have walked where most men fear

It takes a special person to fill these boots

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Courage, bravery and compassion to fill these boots

You filled them proudly

Kia kaha my friend

Arohanui"

Hunt was raised on the Hibiscus Coast and picked up all the personality traits that went with it, said Mitchell."He had all the traits of a classic Coastie - laid-back and calm, community focused and always with a beaming smile."

All police staff were invited to observe the minute's silence by Police Commissioner Andrew Coster last night.

"A week on from an event none of us ever want or should experience, Police is pausing to remember the ultimate sacrifice of one of our own," Coster said.

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Police comfort each other this morning. Photo / Dean Purcell
Police comfort each other this morning. Photo / Dean Purcell

"I have ordered all Police flags to fly at half-mast tomorrow, and we have invited staff to observe a minute's silence wherever they are at 10.37am tomorrow."

Hundreds of police officers, well-wishers and family members gathered to perform a karakia at the scene on Reynella Drive. Photo / Alex Burton
Hundreds of police officers, well-wishers and family members gathered to perform a karakia at the scene on Reynella Drive. Photo / Alex Burton

Police districts around New Zealand have been asked to pay respects as appropriate to them.

Tributes from around the country would be filmed and put together as a special video tribute to be shared later today.

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Earlier this week, National MP and former police officer Mark Mitchell read out an emotional tribute to Hunt in parliament.

Hunt's mother, Diane, said everyone knew her son to be a "selfless man of huge integrity", Mitchell read aloud.

"He loved serving the community, he loved serving his community and protecting his fellow New Zealanders.

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"My heart is crying out that this was so unnecessary and tragic ... My beautiful boy, 28 years young, will never have another birthday."

Former softball teammates from Hunt's high school said he was one of the "kindest, most caring guys" they had ever met.

Flowers and the flags still at half-mast at the Henderson Police Station on Monday. Photo / Peter Meecham
Flowers and the flags still at half-mast at the Henderson Police Station on Monday. Photo / Peter Meecham

Mitchell spent last Friday evening with Hunt's colleagues and superiors, quickly understanding he was "a deeply kind man".

Hunt never had a bad word to say about anyone and was calm and considered, Mitchell said.

Grieving family members are being forced to spend quarantine in Rotorua after arriving for Hunt's funeral from overseas.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday Hunt's family will need to complete the 14-day period before they could get out of quarantine.

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Hunt's mother Diane was said to be further upset by the fact her brother and sister-in-law have been sent to managed isolation in Rotorua - 220km from Auckland.

The family has requested a transfer to Auckland as well as a compassionate exemption to quarantine rules.

The scene of Matthew Hunt's death on Reynella Drive, Massey. Police officers pay their respects. Photo / Alex Burton
The scene of Matthew Hunt's death on Reynella Drive, Massey. Police officers pay their respects. Photo / Alex Burton

Ardern sympathised with the plight of the family but said there is an expectation that the quarantine period will be completed by everyone.

"The condolences of all of us will be cold comfort," the Prime Minister said.

"It's a double-whammy of losing a loved one and being caught up in restrictions that are there to keep people safe," she added.

Ardern said there is "an expectation that people will complete a period of quarantine and that remains in place".

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Even in the case of compassionate exemptions, when these were allowed, Ardern said there was an expectation that people would have to complete seven days of quarantine.

The border restrictions and quarantine rules are said to be adding extra grief to the family.