"Just apply", that's the message from a teacher who earned her school a share of Countdown's $25,000 grant for their sustainability project.

In February, 30 schools nationwide were awarded grants of up to $1000 to kick-start environmental projects, such as beekeeping and installing chicken coups.

Whangaparaoa School was one of them - using its grant to create a sensory garden.

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Grants helps kids' sustainability projects

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Planter boxes easily accessed by wheelchairs were installed and plants with a specific focus on the senses were added to the garden.

It was designed to stimulate the senses and encourage inclusion for those students who were unable to access the school's outdoor play area.

Applications for round two of the "Growing for Good" grants are being accepted by Countdown and will close on November 15.

Students taking part in the creation of the sensory garden. Photo / Supplied
Students taking part in the creation of the sensory garden. Photo / Supplied

It's something Angela Howse, the teacher responsible for landing Whangaparaoa School the grant, believes people should leap at.

"You never know if that grant or round of applications has got your name on it … just give it a go," she told the Herald.

"We couldn't have done it without the Countdown grant, or help from the rest of the community."

The sensory garden sprouted from a dead space at the school which used to house an old playground.

Now, students have an area to enjoy the outdoors no matter their mobility and away from the hustle and bustle of play areas.

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"We had [the planter boxes] specially made so students would be able to see the plants from their wheelchair," Howse said.

"And a lot of the children actually wanted a place where they could sit quietly, where they could read, just be on their own without the business of their school."

Students taking part in the creation of the sensory garden. Photo / Supplied
Students taking part in the creation of the sensory garden. Photo / Supplied

Countdown is urging those who needed a hand to send in their pitches for sustainability projects. The scheme is open to primary and intermediate schools, as well as early childhood education centres.

Countdown's general manager for corporate affairs, safety and sustainability Kiri Hannifin said watching the projects come to life had been inspiring.

"We've been able to help develop the passion and skills we need for our younger generation to become kaitiaki of our precious environment."

"We can't wait to see what inspiring concepts are presented in the second round of Growing for Good applications."