To mark the Herald on Sunday's 15th anniversary, we have gone back to some of our biggest newsmakers to find out where they are now.

Ten years after her son was mistakenly shot by police, Ivoni Fuimaono is still waiting to meet the officer who pulled the trigger.

Young dad Halatau Naitoko, 17, was gunned down in January 2009 on Auckland's Northwestern Motorway as police tried to stop gunman Stephen McDonald, who had gone on a shooting rampage.

Fuimaono knows the identity of the police shooter, whose name has been permanently suppressed by the courts. The Mangere pastor has written two letters to the officer and made repeated pleas to meet the cop known only as Officer 84.

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Halatau Naitoko was shot by police in January 2009. Photo / Supplied
Halatau Naitoko was shot by police in January 2009. Photo / Supplied

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Mourning shooting victim Halatau Naitoko

"Every time I see a police car I still look, I will never forget Officer 84's face. Officer 84 was back at work 11 days later. I forgave them but I want them to know, 'I gave birth to Halatau and you took Halatau's life away'. I wonder if Officer 84 has kids and might look at them and think, 'I took a child's life'."

Naitoko died at the wheel of his courier van and another driver was wounded during a shootout on a frantic Friday afternoon.

McDonald had stolen a car, fired at police and was trying to take a truck when the police opened fire.

Naitoko's partner Stefanie Cook and their daughter Hemo in 2012. Photo / Michael Craig
Naitoko's partner Stefanie Cook and their daughter Hemo in 2012. Photo / Michael Craig

McDonald was high on methamphetamine when he broke into three different homes, pointed a gun at bystanders, stole cars and led police on a high-speed pursuit in a suburban street.

An inquiry was held by the Independent Police Conduct Authority afterwards and Officer 84 was exonerated and did not face charges.

The authority did find a series of errors, mainly involving police policy and command structures.

Over the past four years, Fuimaono has been invited by the police to speak to young recruits and senior officers.

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Hundreds of mourners gathered for Naitoko's funeral. Photo / NZPA
Hundreds of mourners gathered for Naitoko's funeral. Photo / NZPA
Richard Neville, who was also shot by police in the incident that killed Naitoko. Photo / Janna Dixon
Richard Neville, who was also shot by police in the incident that killed Naitoko. Photo / Janna Dixon

"I told them my story and how I was treated and all the mistakes they made. I will never forget going to the morgue to identify Hala. I thought he was badly hurt - I didn't know he was dead. They didn't tell me, that was the hardest bit".

Fuiamono is a busy mother of 12 and grandmother of 11 grandchildren, including Naitoko's daughter Hemo, who is now 12.

Hemo is staying over for the very first time at her grandmother's during the school holidays. Hemo's mother Stephanie was 16 years old when her fiancé died. She was left to raise 18 months-old Hemo on her own. Cook has had three sons since and is in a new relationship.

"I had asked to be part of Hemo's life but Stephanie didn't want that - she thought I was trying to take Hemo away from her. Hemo is 12, she is very tall but quiet like her mum. I think she is happy here because there are girls to hang out with."

Halatau was named after his older brother. Photo / Michael Craig
Halatau was named after his older brother. Photo / Michael Craig

Cook declined to comment for this story,

Fuimaono's youngest son, Halatau junior, was born a month after his brother died.

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"He is 11 and has a big smile. He's friendly and he is a hard worker. When he sees us doing things he's always wanting to help. That's exactly what his big brother was like".