Details of a secret police watch list put together following the Christchurch terror attacks have been revealed.

More than 100 people are reportedly being actively monitored by police after two Christchurch mosques were attacked on March 15 and 50 people were killed.

People on the list included white supremacists and people who were dissatisfied by the terror attacks, Stuff reports.

People "disaffected" with firearm licences, and others with racist and radical views were also included.

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The list is understood to be part of the intelligence phase of Operation Whakahumanu, a nationwide response to the attacks co-ordinated through the Police National Headquarters in Wellington.

Police deputy commissioner Mike Clement said Whakahumanu, meaning to restore, was focused on places and people consistent with the New Zealand Police Prevention First Operating Model.

Deputy Commissioner Mike Clement says New Zealanders are asked to be report any concerns to police. Photo / File
Deputy Commissioner Mike Clement says New Zealanders are asked to be report any concerns to police. Photo / File

He said it included raising awareness through increased visibility on the streets, and visits to thousands of schools, religious places, businesses and community centres.

New Zealanders were asked to be "particularly vigilant" and report concerns to police so a proper assessment could be made, Clement said.

He said while the number of reports has increased since the Christchurch attack, fundamental to being safe and feeling safe is the willingness of people to report behaviours that concern them.

"As a result of the help of the community, Police has spoken with many individuals across New Zealand and in a few instances interventions including arrests have been undertaken," Clement said.

He said police could not say the number of calls made or "lists" of people they are investigating due to operational reasons.

Anyone with information of concern can contact their local police station or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

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