A man who balanced an old La-Z-Boy on a Lime e-scooter and rode it the wrong way down a cycle lane on Dunedin's one-way system says it was "good fun".

MORE: ACC reports another big jump in e-scooter claims

The man, who goes by Jay Bud on Facebook, was filmed sitting in the chair while riding the scooter in Great King St.

The man, who goes by Jay Bud on Facebook, was filmed sitting in the chair while riding the scooter in Great King St. Photo / Jay Bud Facebook
The man, who goes by Jay Bud on Facebook, was filmed sitting in the chair while riding the scooter in Great King St. Photo / Jay Bud Facebook

He said the stunt was about "making Limes more fun" and seeing what they were capable of.

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As shown in the video he balanced the chair on the scooter and was able to travel at some speed.

He said it was "good fun".

Another video from Dunedin shows someone doing a "burnout" with a Lime scooter wheel.

Shaey McDonnell filmed the burnout two days ago, on Spencer Street, and uploaded it to Facebook, saying the scooter was better than a "Honda".

Lime scooter burnout. / Shaey McDonnell

The Dunedin local says the scooters have been used by a number of people "to do skids and tricks" since they launched in the city last week.

"We don't intend to hurt ourselves," he added.

While some found the video funny, others thought this is one example of a person's "fun" ruining it for others.

Lime scooters arrived in Dunedin last week and it didn't take long for a number of people to flock to ED with scooter-related injuries, mostly to hands, feet and head.

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"We have not collated actual numbers, but anecdotally, we are seeing around five to seven presentations per day in the emergency department directly attributable to Lime scooters," Southern District Health Board nursing medicine director Jenny Hanson told the Otago Daily Times.

"These have mostly been a mix of minor to moderate injuries to hands, feet and heads."

Early last week, someone dumped a Lime scooter on train tracks in Dunedin, an act that endangered people's lives, according to KiwiRail.

The scooter ended up getting hit by a shunt train on Sunday.

Police in the city are keeping a close eye on Lime scooter users to try curb reckless behaviour, especially the world's steepest street, Baldwin St.

A number of people in Dunedin have been injured since the introduction of Lime e-scooters into the city, including a woman currently in intensive care in Dunedin Hospital.

The mother of 26-year-old Renee Whitehouse today urged Lime to provide helmets with its e-scooters.

The University of Otago student was not wearing a helmet when she was hit by a truck while riding a scooter home from work at an Octagon bar at 1.45am on Friday. She remains in intensive care, with serious head injuries.

An investigation into the incident is ongoing. Ppolice and the family believed Ms Whitehouse would have been very tired, after a 14-hour or 16-hour day, working on her thesis and then bartending, when the crash happened.

She had been in New Zealand for a year, studying for a master's degree in marine archaeology.

"It wouldn't be difficult for them to stick a helmet on every Lime,'' a family friend said.

"I'm not wanting to [single] them out as a danger but they are the only ones you don't have to wear a helmet for.

"The hard part about it isn't that someone so wonderful and bright is now in such a serious condition - it's just how preventable it was.''

A helmet is not legally required to be worn when using an e-scooter, but is recommended by the NZ Transport Agency.

E-scooters are classified as a low-powered vehicle.

In Brisbane, where it is illegal to ride an electric scooter without a helmet, Lime has been providing helmets.

Dunedin City Council says it has no authority to regular e-scooters as there are a matter for NZTA and/or the Ministry of Transport.