An Auckland police officer under investigation following allegations from multiple women of inappropriate behaviour and unwanted attention will not face criminal charges.

But he has been suspended for months as police bosses carry out an internal investigation into the allegations.

In July the Herald reported that the officer based in the Waitemata Police District, was handed a suspension notice after numerous accusations were levelled at him.

Police initially started investigating the officer after his ex-girlfriend complained that he had been harassing her using a cellphone.

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As his colleagues looked into that complaint, a number of other allegations of inappropriate behaviour with other women he made contact with while on duty reportedly came to light.

The officer was put on restricted duties when the first allegation was made.

He was then handed a suspension notice, which was later actioned.

He remains stood down from active duty.

Waitemata District Commander Superintendent Tusha Penny confirmed this week that the officer would not face criminal charges.

"Since receiving a complaint in late 2017, police have undertaken an internal employment investigation, as well as a separate investigation to determine whether there is any criminal liability," she said.

"The employment investigation remains ongoing and we are unable to comment further about this due to privacy obligations.

"The investigation to determine whether there is any criminal liability has been completed, and after seeking an independent legal opinion, no charges are pending as a result of this investigation."

Waitemata Police District Commander, Superintendent Tusha Penny. New Zealand Herald Photograph by Mark Mitchell
Waitemata Police District Commander, Superintendent Tusha Penny. New Zealand Herald Photograph by Mark Mitchell

The Herald

has chosen not to name the officer at this stage to protect his ex-girlfriend's privacy.

A source close to the police alerted

the Herald

to the investigation into the officer - concerned about the allegations and that the officer was being "deviant".

He did not want the officer's alleged behaviour to tarnish the rest of the police.

"His behaviour is obviously concerning but any big organisation is going to get some bad eggs that ruin it for everyone else," he said.

Penny was unable to comment further on the specifics of the investigation.

"I want to reassure the public that we have a robust investigation process in place and any staff complaints are thoroughly investigated, which the IPCA has oversight of," she said.

"We take great pride in the quality of our staff in the New Zealand Police.

"It is our expectation that every member of our organisation acts according to our values and we know the public rightfully expects high standards from the police officers who serve our communities across the country."