Caroline Naera had planned to give birth in hospital. But it didn't quite work out like that.

Instead the Whangārei woman gave birth standing up and leaning against the drawers in her bedroom while her midwife was on the phone coaching Naera's 16-year-old daughter, Jordana, on how to catch her new baby brother.

"It wasn't the plan we had organised, but it was a really special," Naera said.

On Monday, August 6, Naera gave birth at her Kamo home to a healthy baby boy - no name yet but it will start with a J - weighing 7lb 3oz. Jordana caught him, his 8-year-old sister, Ariana, cut the cord and 4-year-old Anahera got the towels ready.

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Naera's water had broken on the Saturday but she had no pain. She carried on sorting out baby's stuff - he was due on August 25 - and took Ariana to netball. She went to Whangārei Hospital for a check-up but she was okay.

The next day she still had no pain but was leaking water so went back to the hospital.

Again, baby was okay and her midwife said if the contractions didn't start naturally they would induce her on the Wednesday, so her family were on stand-by. But the contractions did start naturally last Monday.

"The contractions started about 4am but they were really irregular. They started about 9am hard and fast so I couldn't make the call to go to the hospital. Jordana has her learner licence but it just would've been too chaotic to go out during school and work traffic," she said.

During this Naera was still in mum mode delegating tasks.

Jordana, 16, was in shock after delivering her new brother. Photo / John Stone
Jordana, 16, was in shock after delivering her new brother. Photo / John Stone

Jordana was also preparing herself to deliver her brother by cutting her fingernails, washing her hands, and breathing - she had been asked if she wanted to deliver her baby brother in hospital but she wasn't sure about it. In this situation she just had focus.

At 9.18am Naera called the midwife, four minutes later baby arrived with Jordana's help.

"One hand was on his head and I started freaking out not knowing where to put the other hand but Tracey, the midwife, helped and it just came naturally where to put the hand and I caught him. It was a really special moment knowing I caught my brother," Jordana said.

Not long after he arrived, the midwife arrived. Ariana was able to cut her brother's umbilical cord which was "freaky" but "special".

Naera said despite not giving birth at the hospital, it worked out well.

"The cool thing is, in my room - that's where I gave birth, I was leaning on my mum's drawers and she passed away 14 years ago so it was like she was still supporting me through this. And then the girls being here, I felt proud," she said.

The latest addition to the Naera whānau who has been surprising mum from the start. Photo / John Stone
The latest addition to the Naera whānau who has been surprising mum from the start. Photo / John Stone

Afterwards Naera spent two days in hospital to have a break and so baby could be monitored. She said the new bub was a miracle, surprising them from the very start.

Naera had an IUD - a birth-control device - in for four years so didn't think she would be able to have a baby.

"It was a shock. Good shock," she said.

Naera said she was grateful for the support from her midwife and all her family and friends.

"I think it's so special. A special moment for his entrance in to the world. Especially because we did it with no assistance. I think that's what amazed and freaked everyone out, but the midwife was really good on the phone."

When asked if they want to become a nurse or midwife, the girls said no.