The controversial community of Gloriavale is under scrutiny again after a document that seeks to legally bind members to secrecy was revealed.

The document allegedly included clauses that stopped members from speaking about the community to outsiders and others that prohibited any legal action, TVNZ reported.

The document reportedly said: "I will not betray any confidence or disclose any inappropriate information about this community to any outside person or any organisation.

"I will not take legal action against the community nor bring any before any government or other authority or use the news media against them."

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Women at Gloriavale sort washing - from TVNZ documentary Gloriavale: A Woman's Place. Photo / supplied
Women at Gloriavale sort washing - from TVNZ documentary Gloriavale: A Woman's Place. Photo / supplied

TVNZ said members had signed the document.

A spokesman for Gloriavale said he hadn't seen the news item.

He said Gloriavale did have a Declaration of Commitment, but he couldn't comment because he didn't know what document it was TVNZ obtained.

"I can make a comment because I don't know what that document is and if I can't see it I can't comment… No one's got it from me, so I'm trying to find out what the document is and where it came from."

Former member of the tiny west coast community, Lilia Tawara told TVNZ the document needed to go.

"I am absolutely appalled by the way horrific way the Gloriavale leaders treat members," she said.

Tarawa fled the Gloriavale community nine years ago with her parents Perry and Miracle Tarawa. She now lives in Christchurch.

She was not convinced by one line in the contract that said legal advice should be sought before signing.

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"Is the lawyer produced a lawyer that works for the community or is it a independent lawyer who is going to give me objective advice," she asked.

The book 'Daughter of Gloriavale My life in a Religious Cult' by former Gloriavale member Lilia Tarawa. Photo / supplied
The book 'Daughter of Gloriavale My life in a Religious Cult' by former Gloriavale member Lilia Tarawa. Photo / supplied

Lilia Tarawa's book Daughter of Gloriavale - My life in a Religious Cult was released in 2017.

Revelations about the documents contents come just weeks after the Greymouth Star reported police were making almost daily visits over a week to the Christian community.

It was understood at least 33 female members of the community had been interviewed.

West Coast Area Commander Inspector Mel Aitken said police had an "ongoing positive relationship and commitment" with the Gloriavale Christian Community, which had a population of more than 550 people.

"A multi-agency approach to safety within the community has been adopted at Gloriavale, and regular visits are made to the community by police, and also in a multi-agency led approach which includes Oranga Tamariki, District Health Board and the Ministry of Education," she said.

Lilia Tarawa, who left Gloriavale nine years ago, has slammed the document seen by 1 News. Photo / Doug Sherring.
Lilia Tarawa, who left Gloriavale nine years ago, has slammed the document seen by 1 News. Photo / Doug Sherring.

They continued to work with the Gloriavale leadership to assist in providing advice and support, she said.

"Should concerns come to police attention or be raised by members within the community, strategies are discussed and implemented to ensure those residing within the community, are kept safe from harm.

"Any criminal offences identified are dealt with by police in the same way they are in any other community."

Gloriavale leader Fervent Stedfast declined comment on the police visits apart from to say "there's always rumours".