Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, has recalled feeling "voiceless" in a powerful voting message urging American women to vote in the upcoming election.

The 38-year-old royal has teamed up with Marie Claire for their feature marking the centennial of women's right to vote in the United States, which is being celebrated this month.

And as this November will mark a presidential election, Meghan has highlighted the importance for women to "make all of our voices heard" following the years of suffrage that preceded women earning the right to vote.

Speaking to Marie Claire magazine's first digital August issue, the former Suits actress said: "I know what it's like to have a voice, and also what it's like to feel voiceless. I also know that so many men and women have put their lives on the line for us to be heard. And that opportunity, that fundamental right, is in our ability to exercise our right to vote and to make all of our voices heard.

Advertisement
Meghan Markle has cited both Kate Sheppard and current Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern as role models. Photo / Getty Images
Meghan Markle has cited both Kate Sheppard and current Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern as role models. Photo / Getty Images

"One of my favourite quotes, and one that my husband and I have referred to often, is from Kate Sheppard, a leader in the suffragist movement in New Zealand, who said, 'Do not think your single vote does not matter much. The rain that refreshes the parched ground is made up of single drops.' That is why I vote."

Meghan - mother to 15-month-old son Archie with Prince Harry - is no stranger to advocating for women's rights, as she previously gave a speech in 2018 to commemorate the 125th anniversary of women's suffrage in New Zealand.

She said at the time: "Women's suffrage is not simply about the right to vote for women, but also about what that represents: the basic and fundamental human right of all people, including those members of society who've been marginalised whether for reasons of race, gender, ethnicity or orientation, to be able to participate in the choices for their future and their community."