Beat the Chasers host Bradley Walsh has opened up about his love affair with New Zealand, calling our country a "bucket list" destination.

On the first episode of The Chase's spinoff show, Walsh introduces constant Sally Wilson who was a 2003 Mastermind semifinalist, beating chaser Ann Hegerty.

With her chance of success strong, Walsh asked her what she'd do with her winnings.

Wilson revealed she'd love to take to her daughters to New Zealand.

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"I'd love to take them to New Zealand. It's always been a dream. It's such a great place. It's the scenery, the people, it's the whole vibe," she told Walsh in the episode, which screened in this country on Sunday.

But it was Walsh's response that has left Kiwis feeling proud, with the well-travelled host declaring his love for our country.

The Breaking Dad star, who travelled across the US with his son Barney, made a pleasing admission about New Zealand.

"I've got the be honest, It's on my bucket list," he said.

"It's a place I've never been to and I'd love to."

Beat the Chasers host Bradley Walsh has opened up about his love affair with New Zealand, calling our country a
Beat the Chasers host Bradley Walsh has opened up about his love affair with New Zealand, calling our country a "bucket list" destination.

Walsh's bucket list dream might just have to wait a little longer, with New Zealand's borders closed to travellers.

Beat The Chasers differs from The Chase with all five Chasers competing as a team, challenging contestants to play against them to win huge cash prizes.

Episode one aired on TVNZ on Sunday.

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Earlier this year, Chase star Paul "The Sinnerman" Sinha opened up about to best beat the chaser.

A new spin-off from the beloved game show the Chase is on TVNZ 1
A new spin-off from the beloved game show the Chase is on TVNZ 1

Talking to ZB's Mike Hosking, Sinha was asked how does someone beat a chaser?

"We're not computers, we're not machines, we don't know everything," Sinha says.

He admits he is jealous of people who grew up with the internet and are used to having instant access to information.

Despite Sinha's medical degree, he reckons general knowledge in the arts and literature categories is usually more useful. He says host Walsh is less likely to whip out a difficult maths or science question.