You will never look at seagulls the same after watching Robert Eggers' latest film, The Lighthouse, a tale of nautical superstitions and closely guarded secrets set in the late 19th century.

His first film, The Witch, was among other things a feminist film. The Lighthouse, similarly, is a cold-hard stare at toxic masculinity, exploring what happens when two mismatched men are forced to cohabit in a lighthouse, on a rock in the middle of the sea, farting, drinking, masturbating, and beating on seagulls.

It's unsettling at times, yes, but also utterly mesmerising.

As Eggers once quipped "nothing good happens when two men are trapped in a giant phallus." And he's right, but before you dismiss The Lighthouse as some sort of ugly stew of perverted male squalor, think again, because this well-considered journey into the mental abyss has been meticulously crafted by a director at the top of his game.

Advertisement

At its centre is Thomas Wake (Willem Dafoe), a salty-sea-dog-turned-lighthouse-keeper and his new assistant, the quiet and guarded Ephraim Winslow (Robert Pattinson), who have four weeks to go about their duties on the weatherbeaten island before relief arrives.

But when a storm delays the impending relief, it tests their mental resilience. Wake becomes jealously protective of his lighthouse and his insistence that only he "tend to the light!" leads Winslow to become curious about its attraction. The film cleverly flirts with magic realism, as the mystery of the "tended light" is slowly revealed.

Shot in black and white with an aspect ratio of 1.19:1, which is to say, almost completely square, The Lighthouse is a claustrophobic and suffocating experience.

Cinematographer Jarin Blaschke also worked with Eggers on The Witch, and his brooding camera evokes photography from the period which is hauntingly complimented by the unceasing cry of the island's foghorn, moaning as if in labour with Eggers' new film.

Add to the director's formal brilliance two highly committed performances from Pattinson and Dafoe and you have a thrilling gothic vision of madness that may well be an oppressive experience, yet is something to be admired.

Cast:

Robert Pattinson, Willem Dafoe

Director:

Advertisement

Robert Eggers

Running time:

110 mins

Rating:

R16 (Violence, animal cruelty, sex scenes & content may disturb)

Verdict:

Advertisement

An unnerving and claustrophobic monochrome nightmare at sea.