Hemi Taylor was supposed to deliver a large amount of methamphetamine from Napier to Gisborne for the Mongrel Mob.

Instead he likely used it himself, setting in motion a train of events that led to a 12-hour standoff in Onekawa on June 24.

The Napier neighbourhood and four surrounding schools were placed into police-enforced lockdown.

The standoff cost the public more than $10,000 because of the huge resources needed for it. Photo / Warren Buckland
The standoff cost the public more than $10,000 because of the huge resources needed for it. Photo / Warren Buckland

This was done based on information that Taylor, 25, was using his partner and their four-month-old baby as a "shield" in their Alexander Ave house, a police summary of facts reveals.

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It's estimated that the fire service, St John's Ambulance and police spent an excess of 400 hours at the incident, the cost of which ran into the tens of thousands of dollars.

Helpless residents travelling home from work had no choice but to wait in the cold behind police cordons before they were welcomed into the warmth of Kings House Church on Riverbend Rd.

Others were confined to their homes, peeking from windows and over fences as streetlights were shut off, leaving a feeling of tension and fear.

"We just want to be able to talk to you and make sure everyone is okay," a police negotiator called to Taylor.

"If you can hear me but are too afraid to come out please acknowledge me by turning your light on."

Taylor's name suppression lapsed after pleading guilty to charges related to the standoff before Judge Tony Adeane at Napier District Court on Wednesday morning.

Police and the armed offenders squad ended a standoff where a man fired a gun in Alexander Ave, Onekawa. Photo / File
Police and the armed offenders squad ended a standoff where a man fired a gun in Alexander Ave, Onekawa. Photo / File

He had originally entered no pleas for unlawful possession of a firearm and reckless discharge of a firearm and appeared via audiovisual link for an application for electronically-monitored bail.

Adeane denied Taylor bail.

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The summary of facts says Taylor, a patched gang member, was paranoid that the Mob would kill him over the non-delivery of the drugs.

The day before the standoff, he armed himself with a shotgun which was cut down to pistol length.

The next day, Taylor, who was on meth that day, went with his partner to visit her mother in Napier.

He took the gun out of the car and paraded around the house, before going outside and firing it at a fence, yelling a gang chant.

He then argued with his partner about the baby and grabbed her, took her to the car and drove off only to return shortly after and pick up his partner.

They drove back to Alexander Ave by which time the police had been alerted.

Police cordon off a street near Alexander Ave. Photo / Warren Buckland
Police cordon off a street near Alexander Ave. Photo / Warren Buckland

Police had received information that Taylor was still armed and was using his partner and baby as a shield in case the Mongrel Mob were out to get him, the summary of facts says.

The area was cordoned off, then went into lockdown with the Armed Offenders Squad, a police negotiation team arriving at the scene, later accompanied by a Strategic Tactics Group from Wellington, flown in by helicopter.

It wasn't until about 1.30am on June 25 that Taylor finally surrendered to police.

Taylor emerged from an Alexander Ave house carrying a baby.

Police searched the address and found the gun wrapped in clothing and hidden in drawers in the lounge, which they were using as a bedroom.

One used cartridge was still in the barrel, with the gun split into three separate parts.

Taylor later told police he had nothing to do with the firearm.

His defence counsel Eric Forster said despite Taylor's previous convictions, he had a "good track record" and had not breached a previous protection order.

Judge Adeane declined bail on the basis that children were based at Taylor's proposed address, with concerns expressed by Oranga Tamariki. He also addressed his concerns around his meth use.

"There are previous allegations of violence against him, police fear for good order," Adeane said.

Forster then addressed the judge with instructions to plead guilty on both charges and made no further application for name suppression.

Taylor wore a maroon T-shirt and remained silent as he appeared via audiovisual link.

He has been remanded in custody until August 27 for sentence.