Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar was a neat freak who loved sex toys, fancy bathrooms and cartoons mocking America, according to agents who tracked him.

In a new book, two agents from the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) also allegedly found letters "from mothers offering up their daughters for sex with the drug lord", according to the New York Post.

Agents Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña sorted through many of Escobar's personal items that he left behind when he escaped from a luxury jail.

In their new book Manhunters: How We Took Down Pablo Escobar, the agents have described the country club prison at Medellin that Escobar built for himself in the early 1990s after agreeing to a five-year jail term.

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They said the prison was filled with luxury items, such as "state-of-the-art televisions, refrigerators and stereo equipment".

Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. Photo / News Corp Australia
Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. Photo / News Corp Australia

"Escobar never slept in the same place for more than two consecutive nights. That included his own prison 'cell'," retired Agent Pena wrote in the book.

"He used the nearby cottages for parties and alternated sleeping in each of them. They were all beautifully appointed, with planters, hanging baskets and luxurious upholstery and drapes. "One of them had a bathroom built like a bunker, with reinforced cement walls that must have been more than 3 feet thick.

"Escobar had a thing about clean and well-proportioned bathrooms, and each time we raided a safe house that Escobar used, we always found a curiously sparkling bathroom with brand-new fixtures."

Pablo Escobar contributed to the building of more than 800 soccer fields. Photo / Supplied
Pablo Escobar contributed to the building of more than 800 soccer fields. Photo / Supplied

More personal items were discovered in the kingpin's office at the prison known as La Catedral (The Cathedral).

There, the agents and police came across "lace negligees and sex toys, including vibrators, all neatly arranged in a closet. In Escobar's correspondence files, which were surprisingly neat and methodically organised, he kept all the threatening notes from his enemies," says Peña in the book.

"We also found letters from mothers offering up their daughters for sex with the drug lord."

Pablo Escobar in his mug shot. Photo / Supplied
Pablo Escobar in his mug shot. Photo / Supplied

Pablo Escobar slaughtered an estimated 15,000 people and was once worth $64.8 billion.

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Escobar also had small figurines of Colombian National Police officers "as a joke to show that he owned the police as well as the entire Colombian government," Agent Murphy told The Post.

Five months after escaping, Colombian authorities tracked down the drug lord and killed him in a shootout.

Steve Murphy (left) and Javier Pena were instrumental in taking down Escobar. Photo / News Corp Australia
Steve Murphy (left) and Javier Pena were instrumental in taking down Escobar. Photo / News Corp Australia

Despite each agent having a $475,000 bounty on their heads, they both survived their time in Colombia and their work formed the basis of the hit Netflix show Narcos.

Writing from the safety of retirement, Agent Murphy, now 62, remains dazed by his past.

"Did we really do this? Was it really over?" he writes. "It felt like a dream."