A World Vision staffer has told about the scenes in Nepal following the devastating earthquake.

A magnitude 7.9 earthquake hit Nepalese capital Kathmandu causing widespread devastation.

Hundreds are feared dead, as aftershocks continue to jolt the nation.

Regional advocacy manager for World Vision, Deepesh Paul Thakur, said he was in his home with his mother, brother and a 2-year-old girl, when the "whole house started shaking".

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He said his 75-year-old mother was "shaking" as she was carried from their house after the quake hit.

"We just managed to come out of the house, we pulled ourselves together and prayed. It was one of life's most horrifying situations."

Mr Thakur said his family rushed onto the street, where they saw houses collapsing around them.

Following the earthquake, Mr Thakur made his way to a World Vision regional meeting of child protection experts from around Asia, which was taking place in Kathmandu.

"There were a lot of people there at the hotel so I went down ... when I was walking towards the hotel ... I saw a lot of buildings collapse."

When he arrived everyone was gathered outside. All World Vision staff who attended the meeting had been accounted for, he said.

Mr Thakur said later in the day the clouds were rolling in and it got much colder.

Many people were standing on the street because they were too frightened to go back into their homes.

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"People are waiting and just praying outside ... I think people will start to go inside [soon] and see the damage in their homes.

"This is a very sad situation for Nepal, we are really feeling the magnitude of disaster ... and we are seeing more and more casualties.

"I cannot express how frightened people are here.

"People are crying, screaming, praying. The aftershocks are coming again and again and it is another add on to the trauma and crisis.

"It is really horrifying."

World Vision Nepal's national director Liz Satow said aftershocks were still rocking the nation.

"People are staying outside buildings to be safe. Our priority right now is to establish contact with our staff in Lamjung who are closest to the epicentre and with all staff based in Kathmandu," she said.