England have been described as "feeble" and "lacking in character" by UK media following the Black Caps victory in the first test between the sides.

The Black Caps wrapped up the win at Mount Maunganui's Bay Oval by an innings and 65 runs this afternoon to give New Zealand a 1-0 series lead ahead of the finale in Hamilton on Friday.

While heaping praise on the Black Caps' performance, UK cricket writers have called out their team's lacklustre performance.

"Truly, there have been more competitive seal clubbings"

ESPN Cricinfo writer George Dobell described England's BJ Watling's batting performance as "crushing any hopes England had into the dust," while slamming the team's lack of penetration with the Kookaburra ball.

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"Some say that, when Watling's innings began, the lava dome that is Mount Maunganui had not yet been formed and moa still grazed happily around the boundary edge," Dobell wrote.

"He had also raised - perhaps reprised would be a more appropriate word - some serious questions about England's game in such conditions ... Truly, there have been more competitive seal clubbings."

They were given an object lesson in Test cricket by New Zealand

The Telegraph writer Scyld Berry wrote England's batsmen showed no character on the field and failed to "grind" it out when it mattered most.

"What England lacked above all was character. The heat was drowsy every afternoon in the Bay of Plenty, the crowd anything but hostile, and there were no World Test Championship points at stake, but still.... England's batsmen and bowlers should have showed more character," Berry wrote.

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"That does not mean sledging and shouting. It means sensing the moment to go in for the kill when your opponent is at his most vulnerable.

"It will take some cultural shift for England to square this series."

Ben Stokes reacts after being bowled. Photo / Getty
Ben Stokes reacts after being bowled. Photo / Getty

New Zealand secure comfortable victory in first Test against feeble England

The Telegraph's Charles Richardson pinpointed England's demise to "poor-decision making" and disappointing batting performances specifically from captain Joe Root and Ben Stokes.

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"While they showed signs they might be able to see the day out, tentative shot- and poor decision-making led to their downfall," Richardson wrote.

Tom Latham celebrates with Kane Williamson after taking a catch to dismiss Joe Root. Photo / Photosport
Tom Latham celebrates with Kane Williamson after taking a catch to dismiss Joe Root. Photo / Photosport

"Stokes' dismissal was particularly important with the aggressive all-rounder looking settled before he played on, letting out a loud yell of exasperation after chasing a wide, shortish ball from Tim Southee. His dismissal at 121-5 sparked a collapse, with Wagner then ripping through the lower order."

England resistance ends as New Zealand wrap up crushing first Test win

The Guardian's Ali Martin had just four words to describe the first test for England.

"It was a hammering".

Praising New Zealand's efforts as "collective excellence," Martin pointed out the below average margins England performed to.

"From the moment England collapsed on the second morning to 353 all out they lost control of the Test and though they made early inroads into New Zealand's line-up, BJ Watling's double century gave them their latest brutal lesson in batting and batting and batting some more," Martin wrote.

"Root was the first man out on a fifth day that, given the deficit of 207 runs, from 55 for three, didn't necessarily require simple blocking: runs had a value too. Perhaps it explained a shot that betrayed indecision over whether to attack or defend, meekly prodding a short, wide delivery to gully."