Sailing the 75-foot foiling monohulls set to be raced at the next America's Cup in Auckland has been compared to flying in an aeroplane.

American Magic trimmer-grinder Dan Morris has revealed the radical foiling attributes of the new AC75s on the US team's website.

He described getting the hull out of the water and on to its foils had a smoothness unlike any other boat.

"Liftoff on the AC75 is surprising compared to a Moth, SuperFoiler, GC32, or the other mainstream foiling boats out there now. Liftoff on this boat feels like an airplane," Morris said.

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"There's acceleration, the bow comes up, and the boat lifts free. In most other foiling boats the takeoff is a laboured effort, with the boat 'working hard' to take off. The AC75 feels easy and smooth."

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Another trimmer-grinder from the American Magic team, Trevor Burd, added that sailing knowledge was key to handling the boats at full flight.

"You can't just be an athlete, or just a power source, on an AC75," Burd said.

"You have to know and be ready for the manoeuvre before it happens, and be able to anticipate. Each manoeuvre or adjustment has steps, requires understanding of what the boat needs and you need to be prepared for what is going to happen.

"If you don't have those factors you get behind in your tasks, and then the manoeuvre doesn't happen, stuff breaks, or both. You've got to be 'heads up'."

Burd revealed that the co-ordination required by the crew to keep the boat stable has overcome the need for sailors to change sides during turns.

Dan Morris, left, with the US sail team. Photo / Getty Images
Dan Morris, left, with the US sail team. Photo / Getty Images

He said sailors on the two sides of the cockpit were "in their own little worlds" with the low swung mainsheet preventing communication across the boat.

"This is where the trust factor comes in. Going into a manoeuvre without your side of the boat having confidence that the guys on the other side of the boat are ready for it would create problems" he said.

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"The good news is that you know that the sailors over there are the best in the world, and you know they'll be ready."

American Magic skipper Terry Hutchinson poses with the America's Cup. Photo / Photosport
American Magic skipper Terry Hutchinson poses with the America's Cup. Photo / Photosport

American Magic have already packed their AC75 to be shipped to New Zealand in a bid to be the first challenger set up in Auckland.

With the Covid-19 pandemic seeing the cancellation of the first to World Series regattas in Italy and England, December's Auckland regatta will be the first chance for teams to line up against each other.

"We really can't wait to go racing," Morris said.

"On a scale of 1-10, our team is at 11, itching to be on the water. We were prepped and ready [to race] this spring, with everything geared towards performing in Cagliari.

"There were just waves of anticipation. You think it's coming, and you try to peak physically and mentally for a regatta like that. To have that first event delayed, the anticipation just builds and builds inside our team."