The Herald speaks to four people during the coronavirus lockdown on how they're isolating, and what it's like. We check in once a week to show you another perspective on the impact of the quarantine.

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The young professionals:

Ashton Lindsay is sharing a villa in Wellington with four female flatmates, all of whom are working from home through the lockdown. Photo / Supplied
Ashton Lindsay is sharing a villa in Wellington with four female flatmates, all of whom are working from home through the lockdown. Photo / Supplied

Ashton Lindsay is spending the lockdown in a villa in Thorndon, Wellington, with her four female flatmates. They are all young professionals who are working from home throughout alert level four.

Lindsay's isolation situation sounds like the premise of a sitcom - four young, professional women all working together from home through the lockdown, with their second living room set up as a makeshift office.

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Among them is an architect, education worker, game developer, a food safety worker, and Lindsay, who works in IT and business intelligence.

But Lindsay said there's been a noticeable absence of "drama" - or she's just been "blissfully unaware".

"I feel bad, but I don't mind it so far. I like my work environment, I'm still getting out and hopefully exercising more than normal. We're eating really well," she said.

Lindsay has found herself spending more time alone in her room than she expected, but doesn't feel there's any tension among her large household.

"I feel like you need some drama but so far no, not for me. Maybe other people are, but I'm just, like, blissfully unaware."

Lindsay had been looking forward to a less busy schedule, but as people turn to video calling to stay social, life is starting to get busy again, she said.

She's also pleased she hasn't "shamed" herself too much in the background of numerous video meetings in her flat's office space - but says there's still time for that.

"You just wait, I'm sure I will."

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The lone isolator

Wendy Belworthy, who is on lockdown alone in her Rotorua home, said Meemee the budgie was an integral part of her
Wendy Belworthy, who is on lockdown alone in her Rotorua home, said Meemee the budgie was an integral part of her "joy factor". Photo / Supplied

Wendy Belworthy is isolating with five cats and her work's budgie.

A self-professed extrovert, Belworthy was conscious her mental health could take a tumble when she was forced to spend the lockdown alone.

But she's feeling more connected than ever.

"One of the big things that I'm enjoying is that people are slowing down and communities are actually caring for each other,"" she said.

"That's just amazing".

In a neighbourhood Facebook group, people are sharing fruit, vegetables and herbs. Belworthy, who describes herself as a "prolific" poster on social media, is receiving 20 friend requests a day. Friends have messaged her regularly to see how she's doing, and one has dropped off free groceries for her.

She said people are remembering they are "human beings" rather than "human doings", and are getting a chance to become more connected to the world around them.

The budgie, Meemee, has been an "integral part of the joy factor" in Belworthy's home with its regular chattering, and when she feels the need for human conversation, she chats to her elderly neighbour over the fence.

Belworthy said the "strong sense of community" has been an unexpected upside to the lockdown.

"I didn't expect to feel so happy and peaceful."

The large blended family

Liam, 6 (left), Matthew, 11, and Connor, 9, are spending the lockdown with their mother, Bronwyn Emerson, her partner, and his two teenagers in Christchurch. Photo / Supplied
Liam, 6 (left), Matthew, 11, and Connor, 9, are spending the lockdown with their mother, Bronwyn Emerson, her partner, and his two teenagers in Christchurch. Photo / Supplied

Bronwyn Emerson and her three young boys are spending the quarantine with her partner and his two kids in Christchurch. The children are aged from 6 to 15.

Emerson knew it would be hard when the rain set in.

That was how she found herself out for a run in terrible weather - because the alternative was to stay cooped up in a small house with six other people.

For two or three days it rained in Christchurch, which has so far been the biggest challenge over week one of the lockdown.

Emerson decided to take her kids from Whanganui to Christchurch for the quarantine, partly as a trial to see how her and her partner's family managed living together.

"I ended up going for a run in the rain because I'm like, I need out, because I'm going to kill one of my children."

But aside from cabin fever during bad weather, Emerson said she was enjoying the "chaos" of having a large family.

"I like the big family feel, it's definitely a nice feeling. I like the chaos, I like the noise. I know that sounds weird."

The first week of lockdown has given Emerson a newfound appreciation for schoolteachers, who she said were "amazing" for being able to deal with a classroom of 30 children at once.

It's also been a challenge keeping children of such varying ages entertained, and getting the oldest teenager involved in family activities.

But tonight they will be making a fire and roasting marshmallows together - an activity people of all ages can get behind.

The essential worker

Dairy farmer Tim Crawford continues to leave the house for work, as he is categorised as an essential worker. Photo / Supplied
Dairy farmer Tim Crawford continues to leave the house for work, as he is categorised as an essential worker. Photo / Supplied

Tim Crawford is the second in charge at a Horowhenua dairy farm

For Crawford, who is categorised as an essential worker, life is going on pretty much as usual.

There's less traffic on the roads and he has to wipe down the inside of his tractor with alcohol wipes after using it, but his work was fairly isolated to begin with.

"Nothing's really changed, I still get up at four and go to work," he said.

Crawford works with four other people and said occasionally it can be hard to keep physical distancing in play in the cowshed, but they're doing their best.

They sanitise equipment after use and stay away from each other as much as possible.

Crawford felt "pretty lucky" to still be going out to work.

"I'm not sitting at home twiddling my thumbs, I'm just at work, working. It's nice to know I've got job security."

He did not feel particularly anxious about possible exposure to the virus through work.

"I have the same risk as anybody else. The risk could be going to the supermarket. For me going to work, the cows aren't going to give it to me, that I'm aware of.

"If they start getting in then we're really buggered."