By Ben Strang of RNZ

The Islamic community in New Zealand is on high alert, expecting threats or worse, in the lead up to the anniversary of the Christchurch terror attack.

On Sunday, members of the Al Noor Mosque were the subject of a reported terror threat, which police are investigating.

It comes almost a year after 51 people were killed and dozens more were injured in a terror attack on the Al Noor and Linwood mosques.

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The first anniversary of the mosque shootings in Christchurch is in less than a fortnight. Photo / Mark Mitchell
The first anniversary of the mosque shootings in Christchurch is in less than a fortnight. Photo / Mark Mitchell

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The Islamic Women's Council's national co-ordinator, Anjum Rahman, said the threat was the fourth she was aware of since the attacks.

"We have been talking to authorities for some months, since last year, definitely, about preparations coming into 15 March," Rahman said.

"Absolutely, we were expecting this and possibly worse things."

Rahman said racist and xenophobic extremists were emboldened by the 15 March attack.

"There were two things that happened after the mosque attacks," she said.

"The first was that huge outpouring of solidarity and support, but the other thing that happened at the same time was that people that were that way inclined felt emboldened and strengthened and more connected.

"The negative and hateful commentary online has not stopped, and I believe it influences the way these people think."

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Rahman said there may be a sense of complacency that had set in since the attack, with New Zealanders thinking the country had changed.

But she said there were still serious issues and changes that were needed.

She said the current political environment meant that people "who aren't the targets of these kinds of threats have a louder voice than those who are vulnerable to them".

- RNZ