Pro-Beijing students at the University of Auckland are planning an anti-Hong Kong counter-rally in response to recent protests by students against a controversial proposed extradition bill in Hong Kong.

In a WeChat post in Chinese script, pro-bill supporters were asked to attend a planning meeting at the university's library - but told not to bring any weapons.

Students were urged not to make personal attacks, but to have bilingual posters highlighting how pro-Hong Kong independence supporters "beat the elderly and destroyed ancestor tombs".

Post on WeChat aimed at mainly University of Auckland students talks of anti-Hong Kong gathering. Photo / Supplied
Post on WeChat aimed at mainly University of Auckland students talks of anti-Hong Kong gathering. Photo / Supplied

"Behave because you come from a great country, and do not cause conflict," the post noted.

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"Protect yourself well and cover your face with sun glasses and mouth masks."

University spokeswoman Lisa Finucane said the university has not been approached for approval for a rally, and there was no requirement for permission to be sought.

"I am not aware of any rising tension at the university as a result of the political unrest in Hong Kong," she said.

Student from Hong Kong Serena Lee denies she faked the fall. Photo / YouTube
Student from Hong Kong Serena Lee denies she faked the fall. Photo / YouTube

The university had launched a formal investigation after three Chinese men, believed to be students, clashed with student protesters at its city campus.

In a video that was uploaded to YouTube and shared widely on social media, protester Serena Lee, 27, was filmed being shoved to the ground in front of a Lennon Wall on Monday evening.

Police are now seeking the identities of the people involved in the incident.

Lee has been accused by some video commentators of deliberately falling down, but she was adamant she did not fake the fall.

"I was pushed, I didn't go down immediately was because I was trying to find my balance. Nothing about it is fake," she said.

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"I didn't try to get back on my feet instantly because I have an existing back injury which I didn't want to aggravate."

Lee spoke to police at the Auckland Central Police Station on Tuesday afternoon.

She feared "more serious clashes" could happen as tensions continue to rise between Hong Kong students and those from the mainland.

"The real issue is about freedom of speech and expression, and that it is not right for anyone to use violence or physical force on anyone," Lee said.

University Vice-Chancellor Stuart McCutcheon sent an email to students and staff late on Tuesday urging respect for freedom of speech.

"I have been informed of recent disagreements and disputes on campus between students who have different views of the events in Hong Kong," he said in the email.

"The incident on Monday led to what we consider to be a conduct issue and the university is investigating accordingly."

McCutcheon said he had asked campus security to ensure the safety and security of everyone at the university.

"It is my expectation that all members of our community will respect our commitment to academic freedom and freedom of speech," he said.

"This means that while people may have different opinions on a matter, they are expected to express those opinions in a manner that respects the rights and opinions of others."

A police spokesman said anyone with information about the identities of those involved in the Monday evening incident should contact Auckland City Police on 09 3026400 and quote file number 190730/1344.

"Police have spoken with the complainant and inquiries are ongoing into this matter," he added.