A security expert says New Zealand's strong show of solidarity and support for its Muslim community after Friday's attacks is key to keeping the country safe from any revenge attacks.

A high-ranking member of Isis called for revenge after Friday's attacks at Christchurch mosques that killed 50 people and injured 50 more. A 28-year-old Australian national has been charged with murder, with more serious charges highly likely.

The New York Times reported the terror organisation's spokesman, Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, broke six months of silence to make the call for retaliation.

Security expert Dr Paul Buchanan, director of 36th Parallel Assessments, said with Isis fighters returning to their home countries after defeat in Syria "the threat is real".

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More than 10,000 people turned out for a vigil at the Basin Reserve in Wellington on Sunday. Photo / Getty
More than 10,000 people turned out for a vigil at the Basin Reserve in Wellington on Sunday. Photo / Getty

However, the level of threat depended on how New Zealand responded as a nation and rallied around its Muslim community.

"Defeat in Syria is sending Isis fighters back to their home countries to resume decentralised, small-unit and lone-wolf operations against soft targets.

"Massacre gives them a recruiting tool and incentive [revenge]. The threat is real.

"But New Zealand may be safe if the non-Muslim population rallies around the Muslim community.

"How we respond as a nation will determine the level of threat."

Christchurch students taking part in a vigil at Hagley Park near the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Ave, Christchurch, on Monday. Photo / Michael Craig
Christchurch students taking part in a vigil at Hagley Park near the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Ave, Christchurch, on Monday. Photo / Michael Craig

The aftermath of the unprecedented massacre has been marked by the near-absence of anger within the local Muslim community.

READ MORE: 'This is New Zealand's Muslim way of doing things' - Kiwi Muslims respond to massacre with kindness, not anger

There have been some frustrated voices - most noticeably from the Islamic Women's Council, who said they had warned again and again of the growing potential for racist attacks on New Zealand soil. But the overwhelming reaction from Muslims has been one of shock, closely followed by humanity and thoughtfulness.

New Zealanders around the country have reported random acts of kindness since Friday - an extra scoop of chips at the takeaways, a discounted taxi ride, a hug from a stranger.

That positive response comes partly from Islamic teachings, religious experts say. It is also because of a determination to fit in to New Zealand life and communities.

"This is New Zealand's Muslim way of doing things," said Eva Nisa, from Victoria University's religious studies department.

"The majority of Muslims in New Zealand are very moderate, very peaceful. And the way Muslim leaders in general try to comfort other Muslims is a role model for other countries.

She added: "The very foundation of Islam is that notion of peace - we don't do retaliation."

Since Friday's terrorist attacks thousands of New Zealanders have been attending mosques and vigils to show support and solidarity for Kiwi Muslims.

In Christchurch hundreds of students turned out on Monday for a vigil outside the Deans Ave mosque, performing powerful waiata and haka that were broadcast around the world.

The vigil was organised by Cashmere High School head boy Okirano Tilaia‎, to "share the love" after two pupils at their school were killed in the attacks. A former student and two parents were also killed.

Thousands of New Zealanders are pledging to attend mosques tomorrow for Jummah (Friday prayer) to show solidarity with Kiwi Muslims.

The Mongrel Mob has even pledged to protect Muslims at Hamilton's Jamia Masjid (mosque) during Jummah tomorrow, leading to an invitation from the Waikato Muslim Association to join them inside instead.

Cashmere High School head boy Okirano Tilaia, organiser of a student vigil at Hagley Park near the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Ave, Christchurch, on Monday. Photo / Michael Craig
Cashmere High School head boy Okirano Tilaia, organiser of a student vigil at Hagley Park near the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Ave, Christchurch, on Monday. Photo / Michael Craig

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has also announced a two-minute silence for tomorrow to commemorate and mark a week since the attacks.

Nearly $10 million has been raised for the families who lost their loved ones in the attacks, and for those victims who survived the traumatic shootings.

The official Victim Support Givealittle page has now gathered more than $7.2m from more than 85,000 generous donors, as of 7am today.

That's on top of the $2.3m raised on the Launch Good page from a further 38,712 supporters.


How can non-Muslim Kiwis help?


• Go and visit their Muslim neighbours, mosques and continue to visit the community centres.

• Attend vigils organised by your local mosque and/or other religious organisations.

• Talk to your families and friends about racism and hate speech, as well as step in to stop it if you see a confrontation, and call it out if you hear it or read comments online.

• Donate to one of the fundraising pages set up to support the families who lost their loved ones in the attacks, and for those victims who survived the traumatic shootings.