The head boy of a Christchurch school that lost two of its students in Friday's mosque shootings is calling on all his fellow students to "share the love" in attending a vigil today.

Seven people, including three students, associated with Cashmere High School were killed or injured in Friday's terrorist attacks.

Cashmere High School principal Mark Wilson said a year 10 student, Sayyad Milne, and a year 12 student, Hamza Mustafa, had been killed.

Hamza's father Khaled Mustafa had also died in the terrorist attack and his younger brother, also a Cashmere High School student, was being treated in Christchurch Hospital for gunshot wounds to his leg.

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Wilson also confirmed former student Tariq Omar, 24, who attended between 2008 and 2012, had died. Another student's father had also been killed in the attack, and another father injured.

Sayyad Milne, a 14-year-old student at Cashmere High School, died at the Al Noor Mosque on Friday. Photo / Supplied
Sayyad Milne, a 14-year-old student at Cashmere High School, died at the Al Noor Mosque on Friday. Photo / Supplied

Wilson said the school began the day with three separate assemblies for its 2000 plus students, to acknowledge the tragedies and give students and staff a moment to come together collectively.

Sayyad was an "awesome kid", Wilson said.

"I described him to the assembly as having kind eyes, a big heart, cheeky smile and a thick mop of hair. He loved football, and indoor futsal, and was an accomplished goalkeeper."

Wilson said he was studying hard and planning to be an architect or an engineer.

Hamza had joined the school last year after arriving with his family as refugees fleeing the civil war in their home country of Syria.

The family had lived in a Jordan refugee camp for six years before being accepted into New Zealand.

He was an excellent horse rider and aspired to be a veterinarian, Wilson said.

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"He was a compassionate young man. Despite not being here a long time he had developed many friends."

Cashmere High School head boy ‎Okirano Tilaia‎ said his fellow students were in a "state of shock" since the attacks.

Cashmere High School student Oki Tillia spent the weekend baking and collecting toys to take to workers and victims of the attack. Photo / AP
Cashmere High School student Oki Tillia spent the weekend baking and collecting toys to take to workers and victims of the attack. Photo / AP

"I didn't know any of [the victims] personally, but we are all grieving. We didn't think something like this could happen so close to home."

On Saturday Tilaia and some fellow students organised a baking drive to support the victims and their friends and families, and emergency workers.

It started small but soon they had more than 100 people involved, bringing in a wide array of baked goods, from brownies to scones.

"It was amazing seeing so many people come together from all walks of life, baking all sorts, and even making sure it was all halal."

The group, based at Tilaia's family home, then dispersed to deliver the treats to the hospital, police and ambulance bays.

"We wanted to make sure we weren't focusing on negativity, on hate, but looking at something positive and sharing the love. Making sure they know we have their backs."

Cashmere High School Okirano Tilaia (second, left) is calling on fellow students to attend a vigil today for the victims of Friday's terrorist attacks. Photo / Supplied
Cashmere High School Okirano Tilaia (second, left) is calling on fellow students to attend a vigil today for the victims of Friday's terrorist attacks. Photo / Supplied

The most memorable moments for Tilaia was bringing small moments of joy to those directly affected.

"When we went into the hospital, I saw these two kids as we came in with teddy bears and food, and could see the joy on their faces. Even just for that split second if we can help them forget about the horrific events, it is worth it."

Tilaia is calling on his fellow students to come together for a vigil this afternoon at 4pm at the memorial outside the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Ave.

"We want to show not only the nation but internationally that youth today are resilient, and not built on posting hatred on social media but about positive action, doing things that have a positive effect on our community."

Tilaia said he was drawing on a Martin Luther King quote for inspiration.

"He said: 'Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that'."

The vigil will involve every person having a candle, and one person lighting the person next to them. Once all candles were lit there would be a moment's silence, before singing He Honore, He Kororia, led by a student.

Tilaia said the event had grown rapidly and involved most of the city's schools.

"All the Christchurch school leaders are coming together for this."

Safety was a priority for the event and Tilaia said he had been in touch with police this morning.

"They were happy and said what we were doing was great. They told us 60 more police had arrived in the city this morning so there will be a huge presence around the mosque."

Wilson said he was proud of how his students were responding to the tragedy.

"I think these are awesome responses from our young people. How we react defines us.

"It is easy to be overwhelmed by the hatred, madness, darkness, in these situations.

"The message we are emphasising is the best thing you can do is turn around and show light, show love, and that can be done in the most simple thing of showing a smile to somebody.

"Hatred won't win. It is not who we are as a country or a city, our real side is being revealed in our response."

Former Cashmere High School student Tariq Omar, 24, died in Friday's mosque attacks. Photo / Facebook
Former Cashmere High School student Tariq Omar, 24, died in Friday's mosque attacks. Photo / Facebook

Sayyad Milne's father John Milne spoke to NZME on Saturday about losing his "brave little soldier".

He said through tears: "I've lost my little boy, he's just turned 14."

Sayyad was at the mosque he attended with his mother and friends every Friday.

"[I'm] keeping it together and tears are helping. people are helping. Just by being here, it is helping."

He said Sayyad was a keen football player.

"I remember him as my baby who I nearly lost when he was born. Such a struggle he's had throughout all his life. he's been unfairly treated but he's risen above that and he's very brave. A brave little soldier. It's so hard... to see him just gunned down by someone who didn't care about anyone or anything."

Milne's other son usually went to the mosque but was on a school trip. His twin sister was at school when it happened.

In a statement yesterday evening Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said a Ministry of Education team would be at Cashmere High School in the morning to provide support and resources.