"Sox was born at 3.23am on the 18th of November 2014," June Farndon recalls with a wavering voice and welling eyes.

She is sitting on her favourite black couch, and if you look hard enough, you can still see some of Sox's hairs dispersed irregularly across its velvety fabric.

Sox resting at home in Mamaku. Photo / Supplied
Sox resting at home in Mamaku. Photo / Supplied

June's living room looks out to the front yard where her four-year-old cat sprinted to her after being shot at close range by a silenced gun two weeks ago.

Sox is one of at least two cats shot and maimed in daylight hours in a residential Mamaku block in the last three weeks.

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June Farndon is mourning the loss of her cat Sox, who was shot near her house in Mamaku. Photo / Stephen Parker
June Farndon is mourning the loss of her cat Sox, who was shot near her house in Mamaku. Photo / Stephen Parker

Another, Booboo, was also shot and dumped in the village in September.

The SPCA is investigating and seeking information from the public to help them find out just who is on the loose with a firearm.

June is distraught. There are constant reminders of her "boy" everywhere.

"Sometimes the littlest feet leave the biggest footprints in your life," she said as lifted herself on to her crutches to find a tissue box.

June lives in Mamaku with her 32-year-old son Luke.

Car accident injuries have left her with chronic pain from a broken back and other broken bones, she is legally blind, she has brain damage, frequent seizures and walks with a frame or crutches.

Sox at home in Mamaku. Photo / Supplied
Sox at home in Mamaku. Photo / Supplied

She said Sox was the equivalent of a guide dog for her, except a guide cat, with a "sixth sense".

He helped her stay calm to prevent her seizures, and if she had one, he would come and lie on her or beside her chest with his head close to hers.

June Farndon is mourning the loss of her cat Sox. Photo / Stephen Parker
June Farndon is mourning the loss of her cat Sox. Photo / Stephen Parker

"People would be horrified if a guide dog was shot. His life taken on 'duty' was no less," June said.

SPCA animal welfare inspector Talia Jenkins is asking residents, particularly cat owners to "keep both eyes open".

Animal welfare inspector Talia Jenkins at SPCA Rotorua. Photo / Stephen Parker
Animal welfare inspector Talia Jenkins at SPCA Rotorua. Photo / Stephen Parker

June Farndon described the shootings as a "criminal act and sadistic, unwarranted violence".

When she realised Sox had been shot, she took him to the vet for surgery, but he died the next night.

"The minute I said 'hello' I already knew what the vet was calling to say."

Sox stretching at home in Mamaku. Photo / Supplied
Sox stretching at home in Mamaku. Photo / Supplied

June is still waiting to get Sox's body back after the SPCA autopsy, and she plans to cremate him.

She still has "no idea" why anyone would've wanted to shoot him.

"He was not a nuisance cat or a wandering cat. He was known and loved in the area... There'll be no more pet cats for me. I can't go through this again."