National's new leader Simon Bridges has come out swinging against the Government in a question-and-answer session with the Herald.

Readers asked Bridges a range of questions including a light-hearted jab at the Minister's perceived love of hair gel.

Bridges swore he doesn't use Brylcreem and said in fact he hadn't used anything in his hair for a while now - when pressed he said he was telling the truth as he was not allowed to lie to the public.

• WATCH: Simon Bridges answers your questions live.

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When asked, Bridges said he'd never "willingly" lied to the public before correcting himself, saying "knowingly".

He also refused to comment on whether he had ever done an Elvis impersonation, though did admit he was partial to a bit of Tom Jones on karaoke.

Despite saying he'd collaborate with the Labour and New Zealand First on matters of national interest, such as the CPTTPA, Bridges didn't miss a chance to criticise the coalition Government as "muddling along".

"I think this is a 'don't frighten the horses' attitude. This is a Government which is fundamentally weak and muddling along. They're not doing much but that isn't good enough for New Zealanders."

New National Party leader Simon Bridges leaving his media conference with his wife, Natalie, and deputy leader Paula Bennett, after Tuesday's caucus vote. Photo / Mark Mitchell
New National Party leader Simon Bridges leaving his media conference with his wife, Natalie, and deputy leader Paula Bennett, after Tuesday's caucus vote. Photo / Mark Mitchell

He saw areas like law and order and environmental protection as examples of those which National could align with New Zealand First and the Greens on, but added that he thought Andrew Little's recent comments about a "tough on crime" attitude to law and order needed a rethink and that he was concerned how Shane Jones would spend his $3 billion regional development fund.

When it came to child poverty, Bridges said National supported the Government to the select committee stage, but wanted to see more substance in the legislation.

"We want it to be about more than good intentions … we want to see meaningful difference."

Bridges, who voted against marriage equality in 2013, said he accepted the country had moved on and the new law was working well.

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He'd be happy to attend a Pride festival as leader, he said.

When it came to decriminalising cannabis, the former Crown prosecutor said he was not in favour, though he did support access for medicinal use.

"I'm very reluctant to see decriminalisation because I suppose my background as a prosecutor doing a lot of drugs trials in the Eastern Bay of Plenty I've seen the effects it has on communities."

• READ MORE: Audrey Young: New National leader Simon Bridges brings out mongrel in Jacinda Ardern

Criticising the Government for what he perceived as "sucking funding" into one or two signature projects, Bridges said scrapping roads of national significance plans would come at the expense of the regions.

If he were to become Prime Minister in the 2020 election, Bridges said he'd offer "a much more upbeat" leadership.

"I'm worried what we've got at the moment is a Government that's muddling through, that's not really going anywhere, and, as I said, that's not good enough."

Bridges said he supported raising the retirement age to 67.