In a candid interview, Prince Harry has revealed his biggest fears and discussed the feelings about his mother, Princess Diana, that still plague him.

In a clip from the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's soon-to-be released documentary, Harry revealed the thing he worries about most is the impact being a royal has on his wife.

He says Meghan enduring the "same pressures" as his mother would be his worst nightmare.

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TV presenter Tom Bradby travelled with the Sussex family during their recent African tour and filmed the documentary, Harry and Meghan: An African Journey. it airs on Sunday evening in the UK on ITV.

Footage includes Harry discussing how important Africa has been for him in dealing with his mother's death: "Ever since I came to this continent as a young boy, trying to cope with something I can never possibly describe, Africa has held me in an embrace that I will never forget, and I feel incredibly fortunate for that."

The 34-year-old made efforts to emulate his mother's actions on the tour, working with the charity HALO to clear landmines.

Prince Harry visits a minefield in Huambo, in Angola, just as his mother, Diana, did in 1997. Photos / AP
Prince Harry visits a minefield in Huambo, in Angola, just as his mother, Diana, did in 1997. Photos / AP

"It's been quite emotional retracing my mother's steps, 22 years on. Let's finish what was started," he says in the footage.

It's here that Bradby asks: "Do you feel at peace in a way yet? Or is it still a sort of wound that festers?"

Harry responds: "I think probably a wound that festers.

"I think being part of this family, in this role, in this job, every single time I see a camera, every single time I hear a click, every single time I see a flash it takes me straight back so in that respect it's the worst reminder of her life as opposed to the best.

"Being here now 22 years later trying to finish what she started will be incredibly emotional but everything that I do reminds me of her.

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"But as I said with the role, with the job, and the sort of pressures that come with that I get reminded of the bad stuff, unfortunately."

Bradby also had the chance to speak with Markle about transitioning into royal life.

"It was a fascinating journey in all kinds of ways, uplifting in parts but also sobering as I gradually took in the pressure and stress he is carrying around with him, particularly surrounding the death of his mother," the Duchess tells Bradbury.

The one hour documentary includes interviews with the royal couple and offers a glimpse into how they balance public and private life, as well as the work they do.

Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola. Photo / AP
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola. Photo / AP
Princess Diana, wearing a bombproof visor, visits a minefield in Huambo, in Angola, in 1997. Photo / AP
Princess Diana, wearing a bombproof visor, visits a minefield in Huambo, in Angola, in 1997. Photo / AP

Bradby told The Sun: "He's loved Africa and devoted much of his life to its people and problems ever since he was a teenager.

"But this royal tour and the film we made of it was a chance for both Harry and Meghan to give people a more concrete idea of the difference they want to make.

"It began in Cape Town, a city blighted by decades of institutional racism. The story of their time in Africa was of passion for their work, pride and happiness, but also a world a pressure and pain behind the brave faces," explained Bradbury.

The ITV documentary, Harry and Meghan: An African Journey, will currently only air on UK screens. According to presenter Tom Brady, it will reveal the "happiness" alongside the "pressure and pain" of being a royal.