A right royal stink, or simply a bride wanting every aspect of her wedding to be perfect?

The Daily Mail reports that Meghan Markle requested air fresheners to be put inside St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle ahead of her wedding day to Prince Harry.

According to Daily Mail royal sources, the musty smell of the 15th century chapel was an issue for Markle, who asked for air fresheners to be deployed before her guests arrived.

Buckingham Palace pointed out that the chapel was a regular place of worship for the Queen. Photo / Getty Images
Buckingham Palace pointed out that the chapel was a regular place of worship for the Queen. Photo / Getty Images

But the request for the air freshners - which reportedly came from Meghan's office at Kensington Palace - didn't go down well with Buckingham Palace.

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The response from the Palace was that if it was good enough place of worship for the Queen, it will be good enough for the Suits actress.

While Meghan and Harry organised the wedding themselves, chapel requests had to go through the Queen.

The insight into the wedding preparations comes in a week where there have been suggestions Meghan and Harry are proving unpopular with royal staff, and can be difficult and "dictatorial".

It is understood that the request to use the atomisers – hand-held devices for spraying water or perfume – to create a pleasant aroma for guests at St George's Chapel specifically came from Meghan's office at Kensington Palace.

The source said: "Apparently Meghan didn't like the smell of the chapel, which, as you would expect, is a little musty. It's not unpleasant at all, though.

"It just smells how you would expect an old building to smell. And that's something the Royal Family are particularly used to.

"Meghan wanted staff to go around with these atomisers, like spritzer guns, and spray the chapel with scent before anyone arrived.

"Royal Household staff stepped in and told her office politely, but firmly, that this was the Queen's Chapel and it simply wasn't appropriate.

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St George's Chapel was built by successive monarchs starting with Edward IV in 1475 and completed by Henry VIII in 1528. Photo / Getty Images
St George's Chapel was built by successive monarchs starting with Edward IV in 1475 and completed by Henry VIII in 1528. Photo / Getty Images

"I don't believe they said no because they thought it could affect the chapel in any way. It was simply the principle of the thing.

"This is a place that has held royal weddings, funerals and even contains the Royal Vault. I don't believe a request of that nature had been made before."

The source said there had been "no falling out" between the two households, but that there was a certain amount of surprise at the request. "Frankly it was all a bit ridiculous and rather over the top."

A second source said: "The two households worked very well together. I don't believe they [the atomisers] caused concern."

St George's Chapel was built by successive monarchs starting with Edward IV in 1475 and completed by Henry VIII in 1528. Kensington Palace declined to comment.