By Andrew Sluys, Driven

News of General Motors pulling the plug on Holden came as a shock yesterday, and has left New Zealand and Australian petrol heads in mourning.

While the majority of enthusiasts were turned away by Holden's decision to discontinue to the rear-wheel drive Commodore, the New Zealand Police Force stuck with the brand, and enlisted the controversial ZB model.

Now that the brand has been pulled, a Commodore replacement will have to be sourced in a few years, so what's it going to be?

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1. Skoda Superb/Octavia

The Skoda Superb/Octavia. Photo / Supplied
The Skoda Superb/Octavia. Photo / Supplied

This Czech-built wagon is the most logical choice considering that Skoda already builds a full police-spec car.

This comes right-hand drive for the UK police, and has been previously tested for NZ duties.

Top-spec Octavia vRS models come with a turbocharged 2.0-litre engine that produces 180kW, giving it more than enough poke for highway patrol. Standard Superb models utilise a 2.0-litre diesel with a more humble 139kW.

2. Toyota Camry

The Toyota Camry. Photo / Supplied
The Toyota Camry. Photo / Supplied

The Toyota Camry is another logical choice due to right-hand drive availability, and Toyota's reputation in New Zealand. Like the Skoda, this chassis has previously been tested by NZ police.

Like the current ZB Commodore, the Camry comes with a 3.5-litre V6 under the hood, and offers 224kW. The Camry would also be one of the most cost-effective options for New Zealand.

Toyota currently offers the Camry in a hybrid model, which would make the fleet less expensive at the pump.

3. BMW 5 Series

BMW 5 Series. Photo / Supplied
BMW 5 Series. Photo / Supplied

While BMW's big sedan hasn't been considered for New Zealand in the past, back in 2018, it served as a replacement for the Commodores and Falcons in two Australian states.

Both NSW and Victorian forces opted for the beefy 530D model, which powered by a 3.0-litre turbo diesel engine making 195kW and 620Nm of torque. This is enough to launch the sedan to 100km/h in just 5.7 seconds.

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It's also worth noting that Victorian police got their hands on an M5 Competition last year, although we wouldn't expect NZ to follow suit with the $230,000 performance weapon.

4. Ford Ranger Raptor

Ford's double-cab Ranger ute. Photo / Supplied
Ford's double-cab Ranger ute. Photo / Supplied

Considering that Ford's double-cab Ranger ute is the best-selling vehicle in New Zealand, it only makes sense to make use of it. Earlier this year, the hard-core Raptor variant version was unveiled as an off-road pursuit vehicle by the UK Police force.

While the Raptor may be able to conquer all off-road terrain, the 2.0-litre bi-turbo diesel engine isn't exactly a torque monster in stock form, and might make pursuits an issue.

5. Kia Stinger GT

Kia Stinger GT. Photo / Supplied
Kia Stinger GT. Photo / Supplied

Like the BMW, this Korean-built sedan was enlisted by Australian police for highway patrol duties thanks to its impressive performance.

The Stinger's twin-turbo V6 pumps out a hefty 272kW and 510Nm of torque, allowing the large sedan to hit 100km/h in 4.9 seconds.

6. Tesla Cybertruck

Tesla Cybertruck. Photo / Supplied
Tesla Cybertruck. Photo / Supplied

If New Zealand police were to enlist Elon Musk's bonkers ute, they wouldn't be the first in the world. Late last year, it was revealed that Dubai's force had put down a deposit on one.

Price aside, the top-spec Cybertruck is a perfect police car thanks to the mind-bending performance, massive storage space, and zero-emissions.

7. Lamborghini Huracan

This Huracan is capable of 300km/h, and can hit 100km/h in just 3.2 seconds. Photo / Supplied
This Huracan is capable of 300km/h, and can hit 100km/h in just 3.2 seconds. Photo / Supplied

Unsurprisingly, the Italian Police Force has had a relationship with Lamborghini for a few years now, and has utilized a couple of the brand's cars.

A Gallardo served as the first V10-equipped police car, and was used for emergency transfers of blood and organs destined for transplant. This was recently retired to a museum in Rome, and the Huracan took its place.

Like the model that came before it, this Huracan is capable of 300km/h, and can hit 100km/h in just 3.2 seconds. It's destined to serve the same purpose, and may scare the public off speeding.

- Driven.co.nz