It might be time for the two surviving Beatles to Come Together after they clashed over Brexit.

Paul McCartney slammed the referendum as a "mistake" — in contrast to his former bandmate Ringo Starr, who believes Britain must "get out", the Daily Mail reports.

Sir Paul said the vote had left the country is in a "mess" and attacked the claim on Boris Johnson's bus that Britain gave £350 million (NZ$697m) a week to the EU. And he dismissed those of his generation who said Brexit would be beneficial because it would take the country back to the "old days".

Mary McCartney, Sir Paul McCartney, Stella McCartney, Sir Ringo Starr and Barbara Bach celebrate the launch of the book Linda McCartney: The Polaroid Diaries. Photo / Getty Images
Mary McCartney, Sir Paul McCartney, Stella McCartney, Sir Ringo Starr and Barbara Bach celebrate the launch of the book Linda McCartney: The Polaroid Diaries. Photo / Getty Images

But Sir Ringo has said he would have voted to leave because it was good to "be in control of your country".

Advertisement

Sir Paul spoke out after he and his daughters Stella and Mary, released a book of personal photos taken by his late wife, Linda.

The launch of the book, Linda McCartney: The Polaroid Diaries, in London on Wednesday night was attended by both Beatles.

Sir Paul made his comments about Brexit after he and his daughters Stella and Mary, released a book of personal photos taken by his late wife, Linda. Photo / Getty Images
Sir Paul made his comments about Brexit after he and his daughters Stella and Mary, released a book of personal photos taken by his late wife, Linda. Photo / Getty Images

Asked by BBC Newsnight about Brexit, Sir Paul said: "It's been thrust upon us by the referendum, which was probably a mistake, I think, the first referendum. Now I don't think anyone quite knows what to do with it.

"I'm old enough to remember garbage in the streets and people not being able to get buried because the grave diggers were on strike.

"That was a pretty rough time, but we came through it. I think it's a mess and I'll be glad when it's over."

Sir Paul admitted, however, that he did not vote in the EU referendum.