The world is weird

1.

A sperm bank in Los Angeles has a celebrity look-a-like service at which women can choose a donor based on the famous people he resembles. California Cryobank website reads: "Researched and selected from the limitless expanses of the internet, CCB Donor Look-a-Likes™ can be actors, athletes, musicians, or anyone else famous enough to be found on the web." Details of donors include height, eye and hair colour listed and which celebs the sperm donors look like — Prince Harry, David Beckham or Leonardo DiCaprio. For some reason, Ben Affleck is a popular choice.

2.

There is a whole industry around anxiety: "Fidget spinners and weighted blankets have helped give rise to the growing anxiety economy, composed of adult colouring books, aromatherapy vapes, essential oils and other products designed to calm us down. And though these items often have little, if any, scientific data supporting whether they really 'work', their explosive popularity sends a clear message: Americans are anxious as hell, and we're trying to buy our way out of the problem," reports Vox.

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3.

During a corruption trial last week it was revealed that some Baltimore cops allegedly kept toy guns in their patrol cars "in case we accidentally hit somebody or got into a shootout, so we could plant them", the

Baltimore Sun

reports.

"Auckland Council must really be short of funds as this is their repair job on a walkway at Bucklands Beach eight months after I complained," writes Gil Laurenson.

Diamonds are forever, apparently

In 2005, two men dressed in the uniforms of the Dutch airline KLM walked into a high-security area at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam. They held up a luggage truck that was loading diamonds on a flight to Antwerp.

The thieves tied up the luggage staff. No one was hurt, and they stole the luggage truck to make their getaway. The details of the transport of the diamonds were highly secret, and police suspected that the robbers must have had inside information, but no one was ever caught.

The diamonds were valued at more than €72 million ($127.7m), although about €30m worth of gems was left in the getaway vehicle. In 2017, seven people were arrested on suspicion of money laundering, but to date no one has been charged with the robbery.